Preservation Achievement Awards

2016 Awards

The Boston Light on Little Brewser Island view project

The Boston Light on Little Brewster Island

Boston Harbor

Boston University School of Law Tower view project

Boston University School of Law Tower

Fenway/Kenmore

The Arlington view project

The Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Center

Roxbury

Burnham Building view project

Burnham Building

Downtown Crossing

Carleton, Cooper, and Walnut Houses view project

Carleton, Cooper, and Walnut Houses

Roxbury

Childe Hassam Park, South End view project

Carriage House at
31 Ocean Street

Dorchester

The Godfrey Hotel view project

The Godfrey Hotel

Downtown Crossing

Lovejoy Wharf view project

Lovejoy Wharf

North End

Massachusetts State House Executive Office view project

Massachusetts State House Executive Office

Beacon Hill

The Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument on Flagstaff Hill view project

The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument on Flagstaff Hill

Boston Common

The Verb Hotel view project

The Verb Hotel

Fenway/Kenmore

Shawmut Design and Construction view project

President's Award for Excellence:
Shawmut Design and Construction

The Boston Light on Little Brewster Island

Photo courtesy of United States Coast Guard

The Boston Light on Little Brewster Island

Address:

Little Brewster Island, Boston Harbor

Owner/Developer:

The United States Coast Guard

Project Team:

Cenaxo
Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit, Providence
Dr. Sally Snowman and Jay Thompson
The United States Coast Guard, Sector Boston

The first lighthouse in America was on Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor and was lit on September 14, 1716. When the British took over and controlled the harbor in 1775, General George Washington dispatched 300 men in whale boats to overtake the island and destroy the lighthouse so as not to be useful to the British. After the war, in 1783, a new lighthouse was built on the site of the old, reusing some of the original materials at the base. This new lighthouse, which stands today, was built seventy five feet high with seven foot walls at the base, tapering to less than three feet at the top.

In 1989, the Coast Guard made plans to automate the light, thus removing the need for a lighthouse keeper on site. Upon review, preservationists prevailed and the plans were amended and the plans were amended, leaving Boston Light as the last and only operational station manned by paid keepers. In 2003, Dr. Sally Snowman was hired as keeper, becoming the 70th keeper, and the first female, to serve at Boston Light. Sally shares the history of the site with visitors and explains the five year initiative to restore all of the buildings on the island, including a complete resurfacing of the lighthouse, which culminated with the 300th anniversary of the celebrated lighthouse in 2016.

"For three centuries Boston Light has guided mariners to Boston Harbor, its beam stretching miles through the darkness and fog like a welcoming hand to world-traveling square-riggers, immigrants headed to the port of Boston from afar, and military ships of all generations," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "With such a remarkable history originating before the founding of our nation, it is one of the most significant resources in Boston. We applaud the Coast Guard for recognizing its significance to Boston and the nation and for reinvesting in this treasure. May she light the way to Boston harbor for centuries more."

Boston University School of Law Tower

Photo courtesy of Richard Mandelkorn

Boston University
School of Law Tower

Address:

765 Commonwealth Avenue, Fenway/Kenmore

Owner/Developer:

Boston University

Architect:

Bruner/Cott & Associates

Project Team:

Acentech, Inc.
Atelier Ten
BR+A
Colburn & Guyette
Cosentini Associates
Faithful & Gould
Haley & Aldrich, Inc.
Kalin Associates
Nitsch Engineering
Richard Burck Associates, Inc.
Richard Mandelkorn, Photographer
Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin, Inc.
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Skanska USA
Weidlinger Associates, Inc.

With each new wave of architectural trends, past styles and preferences can seem increasingly obsolete, irrelevant, and difficult to understand. Today, many communities struggle to appreciate, much less embrace, the austere architectural modes of the midcentury modern movement. The looming concrete facades are often seen as cold, heavy, and unwelcoming; these buildings are often misunderstood. Within this context, Boston University decided to go against the grain of popular opinion and, rather than demolish and rebuild, they embraced their collection of mid-century buildings, celebrating the distinctive qualities of their architecture while integrating modern statements into a new, cohesive whole.

The Boston University School of Law is one of the great midcentury modern complexes of the twentieth century and is considered to be a seminal urban achievement of its famous architect, Josep Lluis Sert. The largest assemblage of Sert structures in the world, this group of five buildings dramatically altered traditional campus planning in America when introduced in the 1960s. The centerpiece is the 1962 Law Tower. Since its conception, so much had changed in technology and the needs and expectations of modern educational institutions that the building no longer functioned properly. The dedicated project team sensitively repaired and restored Sert's tower, integrating a new connector structure that improved functionality, created new spaces for students, and maintained the views and visibility of the original structures both within the complex and from iconic vantage points along the Charles River. The School of Law now serves as an example of how to successfully upgrade mid-century architecture to function in a modern world while preserving its iconic features for new generations to experience and appreciate.

"The work at the BU Law Tower broke new ground in the challenges of upgrading mid-century modern buildings. Solid concrete walls, obsolete and inflexible systems, and structural elements that befuddle adaptation to modern needs, add to a public attitude that fails to appreciate these complex buildings. It makes for a challenge few would undertake," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "Yet Boston University and their team have demonstrated that it can be done with remarkable results. Form- finished walls that frame the building as a quilt interfaces with new construction to showcase Sert's masterpiece bringing us a new way to appreciate and find new lives for these buildings."

The Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Center

Photo courtesy of Anton Grassl

The Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Center

Address:

2300 Washington Street, Roxbury

Owner/Developer:

City of Boston

Architect:

Mecanoo
Sasaki Associates

Project Team:

Anton Grassl/ESTO
Arup
Boston Public Schools
Boston Redevelopment Authority
Building Conservation Associates
Cavanaugh Tocci
City of Boston,
    Property and Construction Management
Dudley Vision Task Force
LAM Partners
McPhail Consultants
Penny Carlhian
PMA Consultants
Rolf Jensen Consultants
Shawmut Design and Construction
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Weston & Sampson
XQuisite Landscaping

When the City of Boston decided to relocate the 500 employees of the School Department into one building, they needed a place that was accessible to local families, facilitated transparency and collaboration, and contributed to the vibrancy of its neighborhood. They found just the place in the Dudley Station Historic District in the heart of Roxbury. Encompassing a city block that joins a bustling T station (the southernmost terminus of the original electric trolley line to Boston), the site anchors the neighborhood with several historic buildings from the 1880s and 1890s, most prominent of which is the old Ferdinand's Blue Store on the corner of Washington and Warren Streets. Ferdinand's was one of the most successful furniture stores in New England, utilizing its proximity to the train line to display its merchandise to passing travelers.

By 2011, this neighborhood of Roxbury was in decline and many of the former businesses had been shuttered. Through the investment of the City of Boston and the ingenuity of the project team, the site was sensitively redeveloped, accomplishing many goals at once. Not only did the project preserve and restore three of the historic storefronts, integrating them into elegantly designed new infill additions, it also added retail, dining, and public spaces which activate the streetscape and add vibrancy to the neighborhood. The site retains its historic character and role as an anchor in the neighborhood and once again is alive with activity and purpose.

"Many neighborhoods are defined by key architectural elements that have served as organizing elements and visual cornerstones for generations. Ferdinand's Blue Store was that key element of Dudley Square. Its loss couldn't be imagined yet its rehabilitation was equally challenging to accept as a reality," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "But here we are, celebrating a new life for Ferdinand's … a new life for the neighborhood catalyzed by the City's commitment to Dudley. A decade ago no one would believe what has happened could come to pass, but it has with remarkable results."

Burnham Building

Photo courtesy of Bruce T. Marin Photography

Burnham Building

Address:

10 Summer Street, Downtown Crossing

Owner/Developer:

Millennium Partners Boston

Architect:

Handel Architects

Project Team:

Bruce T. Martin Photography
Building Conservation Associates
DLA Piper Global Law
Haley & Aldrich
Havas Worldwide
MacRostie Historic Advisors
McNamara/Salvia, Inc.
New England Restoration
Nitsch Engineering
Primark
Richard Burck Associates
Sasaki Associates
Suffolk Construction
Van Deusen & Associates
WSP Flak & Kurtz

Chicago architect Daniel Burnham designed his last building, and only one in Boston, for Filene's Department Store in the heart of the downtown shopping district. Completed in 1912, the building created a progressive and innovative model for American retail through a design that embraced rich materials and Beaux Arts architectural detail. In 1929, Filene's expanded and converted the whole block into its flagship store. Filene's eventually merged with Macy's in 2006 and the retail activities in Burnham's building were shut down. With additions and many alterations over the years, much of the original architecture had been compromised or lost and the entire neighborhood had severely declined from the thriving retail center it once had been.

With a bold plan for restoration, preservation, and a soaring new tower, Millennium Partners took over the site, 100 years after Burnham's building was originally constructed. A team was commissioned to stabilize the structure, replicate the original details, convert the upper floors to office space, bring the building to contemporary code standards, and design new elements as needed. Everything at the ground level- from ironwork marquees to stone clad piers- is new and required extensive research to recreate much of Burnham's original 1912 design. The Millennium team not only preserved a significant building but also reinvigorated Downtown Crossing, launching the neighborhood's current resurgence.

"It's hard to imagine that the restoration of a 1912 department store was a critical element in leveraging the construction of a 685'skyscraper, but that was the case here. Without the careful restoration of the Burnham Building, the rejuvenation of Downtown and the Millennium Tower might never have happened," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "As a Boston Landmark and a Historic Tax Credit Rehabilitation project, all work was reviewed by both the National Park Service and Boston Landmarks Commission, demonstrating that evolution and new uses of protected properties can be (and usually is) successfully accomplished with remarkable results."

Carleton, Cooper, and Walnut Houses

Photo courtesy of Rogerson Communities

Carleton, Cooper, and Walnut Houses

Address:

2055 Columbus Avenue, 409 Walnut Avenue, 410 Walnut Avenue, Roxbury

Owner/Developer:

Rogerson Communities

Architect:

Chia-Ming Sze Architects

Project Team:

Acentech
BLW Engineers, Inc.
Bay Cove Homan Services
Chapin Associates
Choate, Hall & Stewart
Conestco
Daylor Consulting Group
Enstrat Environmental Services
Forward, Inc.
James J. Welch Company, Inc.
Lawrence Sparrow
McPhail Associates, Inc.
NG Environmental Contractors
New Ecology, Inc.
Nixon Peabody
Peabody Construction
R.E. Cameron & Associates
Sharon Loewenthal
Sustainable Energy Solutions LLC
TRC Solutions (Covino Associates)
Vertec Corporation
Wellesley Design Consultants

Since 1892, the Home for Aged Couples has stood stately over Franklin Park near Egleston Square. Once serving as the Elizabeth Carlton House, the Home for Aged Couples, and the offices of the Council of Elders, the site was vacated in the mid-1990s and sat vacant until a new vision was launched in 2004. It took over a decade to restore the three structures on the site into one community, now serving as 44 affordable apartments with no age limit in the Carleton House, 34 units of affordable apartments for mental health tenants in the Walnut House, and 37 elderly affordable apartments in the Cooper House.

The three Houses are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and, together with a fourth building constructed on the site, form a cohesive, historic setting for residents and visitors. Creating affordable housing in Boston can be challenging on its own, but doing so within historic buildings, without relocating the tenants offsite, while restoring the historic fabric of the buildings, is quite an accomplishment. Furthermore, the new additions are sensitively designed to blend with the character of the setting, rather than overwhelm or distract from it. A formerly blighted site now contributes to the neighborhood once again and in multiple ways.

"Recognizing the value and adaptability of this campus of buildings serves as a model for creative ways to bring new life to all corners of our city – filling a residential need without overwhelming a neighborhood, introducing new construction in harmony with the historic character of the neighborhood," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance.

"Combining historic preservation with affordable housing presents one of the most beneficial outcomes for the city. Residents become part of a continuum of the life of these structures while connecting to their neighborhood's past. These can be challenging projects financially, but if the Community Preservation Act is passed at the fall ballot we are likely to see more of these great projects."

Carriage House at 31 Ocean Street

Photo courtesy of Nancy Anderson

Carriage House at 31 Ocean Street

Address:

31 Ocean Street, Dorchester

Owner/Developer:

Nancy Anderson

Project Team:

Ashmont Hill Association
Castlemaine Construction
Design by Sami

In 1894 when this charming carriage house was constructed, ancillary buildings like it were as commonplace as garage doors and tool sheds are today. Not only did they serve as places to store valuable horses, carriages, carts, and various accoutrements, they often doubled as housing for household staff. Furthermore, most homeowners took pride in these accessory buildings and designed them with the same style and details of the main residence. As horses gave way to engines, carriage houses transitioned to carports and attached garages. Many carriage houses and barns were used for general storage and, over time without maintenance, deteriorated or were demolished. Sadly, as we lose these structures, we also lose the history of travel, neighborhood development, and everyday life that went with them. We lose a sense of neighborhood development and their architectural charm. Today, zoning regulations make these types of structures difficult to repurpose and therefore they continue to be lost in large numbers throughout the city.

This project demonstrates how these buildings can serve a new use. Fortunately for this dainty carriage house on Ashmont Hill, the lot on which it sits was subdivided from the main house in the 1960s, thus allowing a separate owner to purchase and live within it. Minimal changes were made at the time, but when the current owner purchased it in 2013, she recalls that friends and family struggled to see beyond the termite and powder post beetle damage, the trees growing out of the foundation, or the unmistakable odor of urine still lingering in the horse stalls. But she had a vision. With patience and dedication, the new owner was able to restore much of the historic fabric: wooden beadboard, original interior doors, and the large, sliding carriage house door itself. Materials that could not be salvaged were recreated. Now, this beautiful home is a charming reflection of its original purpose, to be cherished for years to come.

"At a time when we need more housing, we need to look at every piece of the puzzle, and when we can also save contributors to the historic character of our neighborhoods who can argue? This carriage house benefited from unique circumstances being on its own lot, but imagine if the barns and carriage houses hidden throughout the city could be rehabilitated as beautifully as this one. These buildings could be much desired small homes and stand as testimony to the history, development, and adaptability of our historic neighborhoods," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance.

The Godfrey Hotel

Photo courtesy of Finegold Alexander

The Godfrey Hotel

Address:

505 Washington Street, Downtown Crossing

Owner/Developer:

Oxford Capital Group, LLC

Architect:

Finegold Alexander Architects

Project Team:

CBI
Colliers International
Flagship Photography
    (Gustav Hoiland/Tim Williams)
Gettys
Haley & Aldrich
Howard Stein Hudson
Kalin Associates
McNamara/Salvia, Inc.
Syska Hennessy Group
Tishman Construction Corporation
WSP Group

Downtown Crossing has experienced many highs and lows since the city of Boston first took shape. Though many remember the Washington Street corridor as the "Combat Zone," it has entered a renaissance period, with stores and cafes opening regularly. This new wave of vibrancy harkens back to its last heyday in the early 1900s, when many of the iconic buildings were first constructed and the Ladder Blocks served as the epicenter of shopping and services in the city. Two of these buildings, The Amory, built in 1904, and The Blake, built in 1908, were designed by Boston architect Arthur H. Bowditch and capture the character and the spirit of Downtown Crossing in these days. This project sensitively adapted these two buildings into a modern boutique hotel with all of the latest amenities, including an in-demand Downtown address and irreplaceable historic character.

Both the Armory and the Blake buildings utilize the modern steel frame and large window openings being introduced into commercial buildings after the fire of 1872. With their own styles, each of these buildings retains its own character-defining features with complementary new storefronts. The marble historic elevator lobby was restored as part of the project. The new Godfrey Hotel showcases a jewel in the heart of Downtown Boston for all to enjoy.

"The unique historic character of Boston's buildings is increasingly recognized for the additive value they bring to projects. Demand for these distinctive spaces is growing," says Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "Development can be tremendously successful working within historic building envelopes, and in this case the project made additionally viable through the use of historic rehabilitation tax credits. The Godfrey stands as a prime example that historic resources can bring a premium return."

Lovejoy Wharf

Photo courtesy of Gustav Hoiland

Lovejoy Wharf

Address:

160 North Washington Street, North End

Owner/Developer:

Related Beal

Architect:

The Architectural Team, Inc.

Project Team:

AHA Consulting Engineer
Childs Engineering
Converse, Inc.
Copley Wolff Design Group
Epsilon Associates
Haley & Aldrich
Jennifer Carpenter Architect
Parsons Brinckerhoff
Suffolk Construction

The Hoffman Building was constructed in 1906 by W.F. Schrafft & Sons Confectionary and over the last century has been used as a manufacturing facility for candy and submarine components, as loft space, and offices. Over time, the building was altered and then, left to deteriorate for decades, as did the wharf. Jointly called Lovejoy Wharf, the sight sadly became an eyesore at an important gateway to the city.

Taking advantage of a prominent location and a historic building, Related Beal and the project team successfully restored the Hoffman Building, adding a glass addition to the top, and constructed a new, accessible public wharf that helps to link the Harborwalk along Boston's North End to the Esplanade. As complementary new construction completes the redevelopment of the site, travelers crossing the North Washington Street Bridge and exploring the Freedom Trail are once again welcomed by this prominent anchor of the neighborhood.

"What a joy it is to see new life brought to such a key entry to Boston, particularly since I remember as a boy wondering why no one would stop the decay that brought more of the wharf into the harbor each year," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "Related Beal and Converse have demonstrated that reenergized historic buildings have irreplaceable value. Even when some would say it was too far gone they recognized that this unique building provided a superior outcome more than new construction ever could."

Massachusetts State House Executive Office

Photo courtesy of Finegold Alexander

Massachusetts State House
Executive Office

Address:

24 Beacon Street, Beacon Hill

Owner/Developer:

Commonwealth of Massachusetts;
Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance;
Office of Planning, Design, and Construction

Architect:

Finegold Alexander Architects

Project Team:

Acentech
Building Conservation Associates
Campbell-McCabe, Inc.
Consigli Company
Faithful + Gould
Institute for Human Centered Design
Kalin Associates
Kling Stubbins/Jacobs
Rolf Jensen & Associates, Inc.
RSE Associates, Inc.
Sladen Feinstein Integrated Lighting
Stefura Associates
Syska Hennessy Group, Inc.
Weidlinger Associates
WSP Parsons Brinckerhoff

Originally designed by renowned Boston architect Charles Bulfinch and first occupied in 1798, the Governor's suite of offices in the gold-domed State House comprises the Governor's Office, Council Chamber, and a formal reception hall. Though significantly altered over the years, some original elements survive, including Bulfinch-era plaster. Careful investigation revealed historic finishes which were restored, and a paint analysis discovered an unanticipated original color palette which was recreated as part of the project. Necessary upgrades were installed for accessibility and system improvements throughout the suite.

As the first comprehensive restoration of the Executive Office in over a century, investment in the preservation of these historic spaces demonstrates a respect and appreciation for one of the country's oldest state houses. Deferred maintenance will, over time, lead to the deterioration of even our most valuable and historic places. Through investment and the dedication of a skilled project team, these original rooms of the State House once again represent our city, state, and national heritage.

"At a time when state budgets seem perennially short of needs, we are privileged to recognize a project demonstrating an understanding of the stewardship responsibility our government holds," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "Collectively we need to care for irreplaceable historic treasures, even when doing so is challenging. We can defer only so long before significant rehabilitation is required. Preservation needs to be understood as an active process, and that message begins at the top, the Governor's Office."

The Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument on Flagstaff Hill

Photo courtesy of Spurr

The Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument
on Flagstaff Hill

Address:

139 Tremont Street, Boston Common

Owner/Developer:

Boston Parks and Recreation Department

Architect:

Spurr/Weston & Sampson Engineers

Project Team:

Argus Construction
Daedalus, Inc.

In 1866, an order was passed to erect "a Monument in the city, in some prominent place, commemorative of the fallen heroes who so heroically aided putting down the Southern Rebellion and in sustaining the constitution of our country and the Union of the States." That charge was undertaken by Martin Milmore who designed and fabricated this monument to Union soldiers and sailors on Flagstaff Hill in the Boston Common, laying the cornerstone on September 18, 1871.

Despite its prominent location, the monument suffered vandalism, graffiti, and deferred maintenance to such an extent that even preservationists questioned whether enough funds could be raised to save it. Decapitations of statuary seemed emblematic of the challenge faced. Yet through patience and partnerships, the City managed to not only restore the damaged portions of the monument but to upgrade the landscaping to create an accessible site for all visitors. For visitors and locals alike we now appropriately honor those for whom this memorial was intended, and present a proud face to the millions who tour Boston.

“Looking down prominently from her perch with four marble eagles, the "Genius of America" figure proudly surveys the Boston Common once again," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "Flanked by carved figures below, this monument and the project to restore it demonstrate that preservation is a group effort with many areas of expertise, City departments, and funding sources working together for a common goal. Thanks to the persistence of the City Parks Department and funding from the Browne Fund and other sources, this landmark on the Common was preserved and restored.”

The Verb Hotel

Photo courtesy of Adrian Wilson

The Verb Hotel

Address:

1271 Boylston Street, Fenway/Kenmore

Owner/Developer:

Samuels & Associates

Architect:

Elkus Manfredi Architects

Project Team:

GBH Design Limited
Spot-On Ventures
Weiner Ventures

As the Fenway neighborhood in Boston changes and evolves, certain places within it reflect its unique heritage, such as Fenway Park and the Emerald Necklace. Now, another special place reverberates with the history and energy of old Fenway. Opened in 1959, the Fenway Motor Hotel was once a standard motor court hotel, exhibiting the styles and trends of mid-century America. In a car-centric society, the motel allowed guests to park right at their room, and the circular footprint of the building created a private pool for guests that is so close to the ballpark you can practically smell the Fenway Franks. As rock-era music culture swarmed through the streets of the Fenway and Kenmore Square in the '60s, the hotel became a favorite of both music lovers and baseball fans. However, as this area of the neighborhood declined, so did the demand for the hotel, eventually left behind as a well-worn version of its former self.

Investing in property across the neighborhood, Samuels & Associates saw what had since become a Howard Johnson's as an opportunity for something unique. By embracing the eccentric qualities of the hotel and its small-scale massing, the team was able to recreate and enhance the character and excitement of this mid-century treasure, with a contemporary twist. From the lobby to the halls to each guest room, every detail reflects the original design qualities and the neighborhood's music history. No opportunity for fun and whimsy was overlooked, and hotel guests can experience the best of a mid-century motor court, right in the heart of the Fenway.

“Historic Preservation should encompass our entire history, yet the value of modern structures that some of us may remember in their prime can be challenging to recognize. Cities are exciting in part because they are comprised of a diversity of structures – dates, styles, and sizes,” says Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “At a time when it seems that every lot is ripe for height and density, the Verb Hotel demonstrates that success can be found at a smaller scale. Unique character, with a slice of Punk Rock, trumps height at the Verb Hotel today.”

Shawmut Design and Construction Lobby

Photo courtesy of Shawmut Design and Construction

Shawmut Design and Construction

President’s Award for Excellence

The Boston Preservation Alliance is proud to present our President's Award for Excellence to individuals or companies who have demonstrated a dedication and significant contribution to the vibrancy and vitality of Boston's built environment. This year, we are pleased to recognize Shawmut Design and Construction with the prestigious President's Award.

Shawmut is a Boston-founded and still Boston-based national construction management firm well-known for completing extremely complex and logistically challenging projects, many of which are historic. As an employee-owned company, Shawmut has created a culture of ownership, proactive solution-making, and forward thinking. Eighty percent of its business comes from repeat clients, proving the firm prioritizes partnerships and strong relationships. Shawmut's unique business model allows project teams to better service clients by focusing their specialized expertise within one of the following areas: Academic, Tenant Interiors, Cultural & Historic, Healthcare & Life Sciences, Hotel, Restaurant, Retail, and Sports Venues. Shawmut has offices located in Boston, West Springfield, New Haven, Providence, New York, Miami, Las Vegas, and Los Angeles.

The breadth and success of Shawmut's historic preservation and adaptive reuse projects are particularly exceptional. From Boston's most iconic historic buildings like Trinity Church, to neighborhood treasures like the circa 1927 YWCA building, Shawmut has contributed to projects large and small all across the city. Many of their projects are Alliance award winners, including the rehabilitation of the midcentury modern Walgreens flagship store downtown, the renovation and addition of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and one of the 2016 winners—the Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building in Roxbury, former home of Ferdinand's Blue Store, a complex and successful interface of new and old. With their extensive expertise and long experience here in Boston, Shawmut has been the steward of many of our treasures, and after so many years have successfully shepherded much of our historic city. It is our pleasure to recognize their continued dedication to Boston's historic places.

Congratulations to Shawmut Design and Construction, winner of the 2016 President’s Award for Excellence.