Preservation Achievement Awards

2015 Awards

Alan and Sherry Leventhal Center view project

Alan and Sherry Leventhal Center

Boston University

Alvah Kittredge House view project

Alvah Kittredge House

Roxbury

The Arlington view project

The Arlington

Back Bay

Boys Girls Clubs of Boston, Mattapan Teen Center view project

Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston, Mattapan Teen Center

Mattapan

Brigham Patient Parking Garage and Thea and James M. Stoneman Centennial Park, Longwood Medical Area view project

Brigham Patient Parking Garage, Stoneman Centennial Park

Longwood Medical Area

Childe Hassam Park, South End view project

Childe Hassam Park

South End

Hong Lok Project, Chinatown view project

Hong Lok Project

Chinatown

MIT Alpha Theta Chapter of Sigma Chi Fraternity Residences view project

MIT Alpha Theta Chapter of Sigma Chi Fraternity Residences

Back Bay

The Parish of All Saints view project

The Parish of All Saints

Ashmont

Restoration of Lion and Unicorn Statues view project

Restoration of Lion and Unicorn Statues

Old State House

Henry Moss view project

Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement
Henry Moss

Jon Davis view project

President's Award for Excellence
Jon Davis

Alan and Sherry Leventhal Center at Boston University

Photo courtesy of Robert Benson Photography

Alan and Sherry Leventhal Center at Boston University

Address:

233 Bay State Road

Owner:

Boston University

Architect:

Goody Clancy

Project Team:

Acentech
Atelier Ten
Bay State Road/Back Bay West
     Architectural Conservation Commission,
     City of Boston
Boston Redevelopment Authority
Columbia Construction Co.
Ganesh Ramachandran
Goody Clancy
McNamara/Salvia, Inc.
Nitsch Engineering
R.W. Sullivan Engineering
Reed Hilderbrand Associates, Inc.
Robert Benson
Wil-Spec, LLC
WSP Flack and Kurtz

Standing at the western end of the Bay State Road and within Back Bay West Architectural Conservation District, the Alan and Sherry Leventhal Center blends its historic International Style form with its new role as the home of Boston University Admissions. It is recognized as one of the few examples of International Style architecture in the Back Bay area, with original design motifs including a sleek rounded facade, open interior spaces, subtle applied ornamentation, and a textured limestone band. Erected in 1953, the building served as the University’s Hillel House until 2007; it housed lounges, dining space, classrooms, offices, and a small chapel. After Hillel relocated, the building sat challenged for a viable new use until the University decided to transform this hidden, modern gem into a focal point for prospective students and visitors. Long of interest to scholars of modern design, the structure now has a new life, central to Boston University’s urban campus, a stately blending of old and new.

The project exemplifies the challenges of balancing preservation and the renewal of International Style buildings while meeting the demands of today’s college campus. A south-facing horizontal band of windows, strategically placed below the original textured limestone façade, displays internal activity, while making the building more outward-facing and inviting. A new 150-seat auditorium, in space formally occupied by the Hillel social hall, was designed to maintain the large windows overlooking the Charles River. Along with updating existing spaces, an addition to the original building further reinforces its new role as the Admissions building. The crisp north-facing glass volume increases the functional space to accommodate larger numbers of visitors, and provides a new stair connecting all levels, detailed with the emblematic Boston University Red, to accent the circulation path. The original forms of the building have been reinforced by the new additions which appear prominently, and signal to the community that Boston University recognizes the value of its past and utilizes it as a springboard to the future.

“This renewal project allows tens of thousands of visitors each year to experience Boston’s history and character as they move through the building and site as guests of Boston University,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “As a result, this transformative building serves as an anchor to a new urban plaza, becoming a marker announcing Boston University to travelers along Storrow Drive and the Charles River.”

Alvah Kittredge House, Roxbury

Photo courtesy of Greg Premru Photography Inc.

Alvah Kittredge House, Roxbury

Address:

10 Linwood Street

Owner:

Kittredge LLC
Historic Boston Incorporated

Architect:

Amory Architects PC

Project Team:

AKF Group
BCA New England
Boston Landmarks Commission
Boston Redevelopment Authority
Building Science Corporation
Certified Property Management
Department of Neighborhood Development
H.W. Moore Associates, Inc.
Klein Hornig LLP
Metric Construction
Norian/Siani Engineering, Inc.
Structures North Consulting Engineers
Tremont Preservation Services LLC

The Alvah Kittredge House, a magnificent Greek Revival home built in 1836, is now restored and treasured, once again, by residents of Roxbury. The house is distinctive for its architectural characteristics and for its associations with the lives of two prominent Bostonians, Alvah Kittredge and Nathaniel Bradlee. Kittredge, a businessman and developer in the mid-19th century, built the mansion to house his expanding family. Bradlee, a noted Boston architect, purchased the house in 1871 and lived there until his death in 1888. In 1975, the Roxbury Action Program purchased the house and used it as their headquarters, but by 1991 the organization was no longer able to maintain the large building and the site sat abandoned for twenty years. Many of the architectural features, such as the front columns, deteriorated beyond repair, the interior was severely vandalized, and a neglected Kittredge House devolved into blight, frustrating its neighborhood.

In 2011, Historic Boston, Inc., a long-active and dedicated nonprofit preservation group, acquired the building and immediately took action to stabilize the site before restoration could begin. With over $1 million in grants and a total budget of $4.2 million, HBI focused on restoring the historic character of the building and returning it to the community as housing, including two units set aside for low-income tenants. Though the interior of the building had been altered, HBI was able to restore many features, including the original marble and slate floor in the central hall and the ornate, marbleized, painted glass ceiling from the late 1800s. On the exterior, the front façade of largely original flush-board siding and two unadorned pilasters at the corners of the building were restored. The roof and its octagonal cupola are now fully restored. Three of the four sidewall chimneys remained but were in poor condition, so required rebuilding and the fourth, which had been lost, was reconstructed. After extensive efforts by HBI, this neighborhood gem is now beautifully restored, occupied and successfully reactivates the Highland Park area of Roxbury.

“Where some see only a sad lost cause in a once-historic gem, organizations like HBI see opportunity,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “HBI has once again returned an important piece of Boston’s heritage to productive use in our neighborhoods. The economic and psychological impacts of architecturally grand and visibly transformative projects like the Kittredge House have positive ripple effects, catalyzing their neighbors, the broader community, and the city as a whole.”

The Arlington, Back Bay

Photo courtesy of Peter Vanderwarker

The Arlington, Back Bay

Address:

100 Arlington Street & 250 Stuart Street

Owner:

100 Arlington Acquisition Company

Architect:

Elkus Manfredi Architects

Project Team:

Acentech
Cosentini Associates
DLA Piper US LLP
Environmental Health & Engineering, Inc.
Goldstein-Milano
Gunther Engineering/DGT
Haley & Aldrich, Inc.
Jenkins & Huntington, Inc.
John Moriarty & Associates, Inc.
Lam Partners
Tremont Preservation Services
VHB/Vanasse Hangen & Brustlin
Wessling Architects

The Arlington was constructed in 1927 by the Boston Consolidated Gas Company for their headquarters and other tenants. It is an excellent example of the later work of prolific Boston architectural firm Parker, Thomas and Rice—a characteristic Boston, tall office building—a steel structure and exterior masonry cladding, which exhibits a well-crafted handling of the restrained Art Moderne vocabulary with its Classical Revival massing. In 1965, UMass Boston occupied the entire building; from 1995 until 2010 it housed The Boston Renaissance Charter School. When the 13-floor building was converted to educational spaces, historic elements on the upper floors were lost. However, elements of the façade, lobby, and double-height retail space remained largely intact. The renovation of The Arlington restores these surviving features and reengages the building with its rich history as the former headquarters of Boston’s primary gas utility company.

The concept for the restoration project was to transform the vacant academic space into 128 residential apartment units with ground-floor retail space. The entire limestone façade was cleaned and repaired, and the north elevation was almost completely reconstructed. Limestone corners were reconstructed to match the original profiles and the steel structure behind was extensively repaired. All building windows were replaced with more historically appropriate designs than had previously been installed. Historic elements, including bronze work, marble and intricately designed plaster ceilings were restored, and are now prominent, visible features of a new entry. Improvements to the lobby included restored and reconstructed stone at the new entrance door, stone flooring plaster ceiling, lighting, restored marble walls and bronze elements. On the upper floors, the original elevator entrance frames and terrazzo flooring border were preserved, along with the distinctive mail chute. By celebrating its historic fabric, the project has reengaged the building with its historic neighbors and is a prime example of the spectacular results that can be achieved when a development team is willing to commit the time, effort, and funds necessary to restore the character of a Boston landmark and preserve it for future generations.

“Historic office buildings of all shapes and size play a vital role in defining the character of Boston, and many are being restored, re-born, and rebranded as integral parts of their neighborhood, engaging the street with retail which in many cases is a return to original,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Here food, drink and artwork take the place where stoves, ovens, and other gas appliances were once displayed, surrounded by a classic stone façade and brass lobby elements. The Arlington project demonstrates that the unique character of each these buildings adds real value to the city and to their developers.”

Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston, Mattapan Teen Center, Mattapan

Photo courtesy of Andrew Thomas Ryan

Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston, Mattapan Teen Center, Mattapan

Address:

10 Hazelton Street

Owner:

Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston

Architect:

The Architectural Team, Inc.

Project Team:

Janey Construction Management
     & Consulting, Inc.
Melling Engineering, Pc

The Mattapan Branch Library building was built in response to the rapid growth of the Mattapan community in 1931. For more than 75 years, it served as an essential hub for the neighborhood until a new library facility opened nearby. Rather than discount and cast aside the historic building, the city wisely chose a more environmentally, socially and economical sensitive approach. Through the combined efforts of the City of Boston and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston, the library has been transformed into a youth development space for teens, with programs focused on leadership, academic success, performing arts, and healthy lifestyles. The Mattapan Teen Center now serves as the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston's first standalone facility exclusively for teenagers.

The building features soaring ceilings accentuated by arched windows, columns, and a white and gold City of Boston seal, which hangs over the common room. Ornate columns and vaulted arch ceilings were carefully restored and updated to preserve the historic architectural detailing. Inside, the existing plaster work was restored; new acoustically tuned walls were installed with appropriate glazing for program supervision and visual connection, along with newly refinished, built-in furniture, an open-style community kitchen, a computer lab, an education area with meeting spaces, a community theater that can also be used for fitness activities, and a music studio. Executed with an open design plan, it allows for safe, lively and functional teen programming that encourages social engagement and participation. The preservation of the historic structure reaches a new audience with 13-18 year olds, creating a greater appreciation and support for historic preservation and adaptive reuse. It is not only an illustration of architectural rehabilitation, but an excellent example of community preservation and involvement. By restoring a library and transforming it into a new space for underserved teens, it is once again a meaningful asset to the community that will continue to promote prosperity and remain an essential hub for the neighborhood.

“In a culture that too often focuses on disposal and replacement, the City of Boston has demonstrated to its young people that there is a better way—that reuse and recycling applies to more than paper and glass,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “We applaud the city for providing teens with an engaging and updated historic building where they can learn firsthand that thoughtfully designed spaces of the past can be inspiring and adaptable to modern needs.”

Brigham Patient Parking Garage and Thea and James M. Stoneman Centennial Park, Longwood Medical Area

Photo courtesy of Ed Wonsek

Brigham Patient Parking Garage and Thea and James M. Stoneman Centennial Park, Longwood Medical Area

Address:

15 Francis Street

Owner:

Partners HealthCare System
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Architect:

HDR Architecture, Inc.

Project Team:

Halvorson Design Partnership
Leggat McCall Properties
McPhail Associates
RDK Engineers
Simon Design Engineering
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.
Walsh Brothers, Incorporated

Brigham and Women’s Hospital was founded forty years ago through a merger of three existing hospitals. The oldest of the three hospitals was the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, established in 1913. The original campus included a formal entry court with an axial approach to the columnar façade of the hospital’s red brick building. Sweeping areas of lawn framed either side of the formal drive, establishing a grand entrance and striking presence along Francis Street. As the Hospital expanded, this open lawn space was paved over with asphalt to accommodate the increased need for parking. Large areas of pavement supported vehicular use at the cost of the pedestrian experience. The impressive, classical entry and its approach had been lost for many decades.

This project ambitiously resolved parking problems, restored the façades of three historic buildings, and revitalized the open space to invite the public onto the hospital’s front yard. Ground literally lost was reclaimed. It reestablished the presence of the Hospital while promoting the therapeutic benefits of the landscape by replacing a congested surface parking lot, vehicular drive, and a one-story accessory building. The project team devised an ambitious plan to provide below-grade parking for 400 cars and 95 bicycles and build a landscape over the garage that recreated the much-needed open space for the Hospital and the surrounding neighborhood. It also enhanced pedestrian accessibility and neighborhood connections. The project team reestablished the formality of the original landscape while creating a flexible open space that can support social gatherings and events. By creating an inviting, fully accessible and vibrant green space, the Brigham Patient Parking Garage and Thea and James M. Stoneman Centennial Park strengthens the relationship between the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the surrounding community.

“The congested Longwood Medical Area is a challenging place, with healthcare demands understandably the highest priority. Yet there are opportunities where preservation, healthcare, and general public benefit can co-exist,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Brigham and Women’s has demonstrated that we can turn back the clock and erase the scars on the landscape, in this case bringing back the grand entrance public park and restoring the classical faced of their historic Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.”

Childe Hassam Park, South End

Photo courtesy of The Friends of Childe Hassam Park

Childe Hassam Park, South End

Address:

314-320 Columbus Avenue

Owner:

City of Boston, Department of Recreation

Landscape Architects:

Ann G. Johnson Associates
BSC Group

Project Team:

BSC Group

Childe Hassam Park is located in the South End Landmark District on a triangle where Columbus Avenue, Chandler Street and Dartmouth Street intersect. The great American impressionist, Childe Hassam, lived on Columbus Avenue in the Albemarle Hotel on the city block where the park is located. One of his works, Rainy Day, Columbus Avenue, shows a corner similar to this one, a location which has evolved through the decades—from a row house, to a gas station, to a very basic 1970s park that deteriorated into non-functionality, to the much beloved pocket park we see today.

The treatment of open lots that once housed buildings, so called “missing teeth,” requires sensitivity to adjacent structures and community needs, as well as a keen design sensibility. Here in the South End amidst 19th-century brownstones, as well as in our other Landmark Districts, there are a variety of approaches possible. In this case, neighbors in the South End joined together and in 2000 formed a nonprofit to redesign the open space in collaboration with the City of Boston. The updated park is now a welcoming space with flowers, trees, and benches. Two sculptures are on display in the park: a bronze bas-relief of Hassam by Reno Pisano, and Kahil Gibran’s Ad Astra. The park once again welcomes South End residents to enjoy a serene green space in the heart of an urban neighborhood, addressing the “missing tooth” in a sensitive manner that also honors an important, nationally recognized figure from the neighborhood.

“Balancing new construction and open space is always an ongoing dialog in the city, with green space often the loser. Yet small neighborhood parks are essential elements of a healthy neighborhood," said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "The added bonus is to recognize an important figure from our city's past, one well-known or perhaps lessor known and thus an educational opportunity. In this case, a dedicated neighborhood group formed and persisted for many years to produce an asset of importance to the South End.”

Hong Lok Project, Chinatown

Hong Lok Project, Chinatown

Address:

11-31 Essex Street

Owner:

Hong Lok House

Project Team:

Building Conservation Associates, Inc.
Chia-Ming Sze Architect, Inc.
Rogerson Communities
Walsh Brothers Construction

Located on Essex Street in Chinatown, the Hong Lok Project consists of a series of historic storefronts within the Liberty Tree National Register District. The project entailed the preservation and reconstruction of three deteriorated historic facades and their integration into a new, single facility—Hong Lok House—which provides much-needed low income housing in the Chinatown community. All three building facades were restored or partially reconstructed, with a new building built behind tying them together.

One of these buildings, a 3-story Italianate, is the oldest wooden commercial building in Boston. Its missing storefront was reconstructed and the façade was repainted. Next door, the four-story brownstone, sandstone, and granite façade was cleaned and repointed with its windows repaired and storefront reconstructed. New infill with an entrance to the parking garage is next, followed by a historic Second Empire façade. The stones of this structure were disassembled and carefully reconstructed, and the wooden cornice and storefront were restored. Though this is a nontraditional approach to historic preservation, the Hong Lok project reflects the efforts of the Hong Lok House to creatively weave the demand for affordable housing with the preservation of local history and neighborhood character.

“In the narrow streets of Chinatown, people engage with historic buildings in an intimate, direct way from the sidewalk. The Hung Lok project is a case where we could have entirely lost that street view, said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. "We are pleased that the project evolved so that much-needed community housing was attainable, while the historic commercial facades were saved. This block is serving the Chinatown needs with a new life, but the historic feel of the street is largely maintained.”

MIT Chapter of Alpha Theta Sigma Chi Fraternity Residences, Back Bay

Photo courtesy of Sean Litchfield Photography

MIT Alpha Theta Chapter of Sigma Chi Fraternity Residences, Back Bay

Address:

532 Beacon Street

Owner:

Alpha Theta Sigma Chi

Owner’s Representative:

Oxbow Partners

Architect:

LDa Architecture & Interiors

Project Team:

Back Bay Architectural Commission, City of Boston
Building Engineering Resources, Inc.
Foley Buhl Roberts & Associates Inc.
Haley & Aldrich
Judith Selwyn
LDa Architecture & Interiors
Nardone Electric Corp.
Nistch Engineering
Norton S. Remmer Consulting Engineers
Sea-Dar Construction
Sean Litchfield

Since 1919, the grand residence at 532 Beacon Street, built in 1900 for Francis and Mary Kittredge, has housed MIT’s Alpha Theta Chapter of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. As the longest continuously operating fraternity at MIT (founded at MIT in the Back Bay in 1882) Alpha Theta Sigma Chi recognizes the importance of preserving their legacy as part of the MIT community, the City of Boston, their historic Back Bay neighborhood, and a national Greek organization. Their commitment to the careful preservation and stewardship of their historic home illustrates the importance of these relationships, and dedication to serve as good neighbors within the Back Bay.

This project encompassed a complete restoration of the historic Beacon Street façade, selective interior restoration of the first and second floor common spaces, restoration of the main stair hall from the first floor to the fourth floor, renovation of all basement spaces, and renovation of bedrooms and bathrooms. A new fifth floor addition added an upper level to the fourth floor bedrooms in a suite configuration, providing more generous living spaces for the building's residents. Original decoration and ornamentation was restored to preserve the appearance of the Beacon Street façade. Historic leaded glass windows at interior and exterior locations were removed, restored, and reinstalled. The project included restoring and extending the historic stair to preserve all original detail including original nosing profiles and unique turned balusters and newels, and the stairway now extends into the fifth floor addition. In the common areas, including the library, dining room and living room, wood paneling was repaired and refinished an all-new paneling, and millwork was matched to the original profiles. New systems were entirely integrated into existing architecture, including a new elevator that provides wheelchair access to most of the building, an accessible entrance, and exterior landscaping. This project exemplifies how successful improvement to building performance, accessibility and life safety can be integrated with a preservation project and thus implemented without negative impacts to the historic fabric of a contributing building.

“When thinking about the activities within a fraternity house, restoration of historic features is unlikely to come to mind. However, the work of Alpha Theta Sigma Chi demonstrates the power of history, legacy, and tradition and the importance the physical manifestation of that past has as a statement and actor upon our current culture and life experience,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “The multi-year commitment by the fraternity members to steward this historic property is a wonderful example of preservation in unexpected places.”

The Parish of All Saints, Ashmont

Photo courtesy of Bruce McLay

The Parish of All Saints, Ashmont

Address:

209 Ashmont Street

Owner:

The Parish of All Saints

Architect:

John G. Waite Associates, Architects

Project Team:

Consigli Construction Co., Inc.
Historic Boston Incorporated
Historic New England
Jeffrey Gonyeau Preservation Services
Johanna Gurland Associates
Julie L. Sloan, LLC
Lyn Hovey Studio
Smith + St. John

The Parish of All Saints in Dorchester, a parish of the Episcopal Church, was designed in 1892 by renowned architect Ralph Adams Cram and his partner Bertram Goodhue. It is considered one of Cram’s most important works and a landmark in American architectural history. All Saints became a prototype for 20th-century American church design in the Gothic Revival style. Enlisting the assistance of the finest American and European craftspeople including Charles Connick and Johannes Kirchmayer, Cram embellished the structure with additions, furnishings and art over the course of forty years. All Saints was consistently published in American and European architectural journals of the time. In 2009, after almost 120 years of church use, the Parish recognized the condition of the building had reached a critical point and began planning a comprehensive restoration project.

In the summer of 2013, the Parish launched an extensive campaign to restore the original buildings, update systems, and improve accessibility. The Quincy granite was completely repointed and the masonry brick and stucco repaired. All of the stained glass, leaded glass, and other windows were restored, with many windows completely rebuilt to original specifications. Interior finishes were renewed, including the careful removal of paint, and the wooden window tracery in the church, which suffered from extensive hidden rot, was restored. The light fixtures, designed in 1923, were restored to their original appearance. The slate and copper roofs and gutters of the entire complex were repaired. Accessible entries were provided throughout the complex, including a sensitive new addition that eased access to the various sections of the complex. This project not only restored and enhanced this historic site—which represents an important part of the architectural heritage of Boston, the Commonwealth, and the country—but also ensures that All Saints can continue to be the center of the spiritual life of the diverse Parish and play a crucial role in the Dorchester neighborhood as a vibrant center of arts, education, and civic programming. The project wisely established an endowment to ensure the continued quality stewardship such an important building deserves.

“There are remarkable, world-class buildings in our neighborhoods that are sadly little-known to the broader community. All Saints is one particularly impressive example, its significance known to architectural historians but not by those who pass it daily,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “The importance of this building is matched by the quality of work and its extent. From roof to foundation, outer skin to interior detail, nothing was ignored in a superb restoration that demonstrates the utmost care and dedication to stewardship by All Saints Parish and their generous donors.”

Restoration of Lion and Unicorn Statues, Old State House

Photo courtesy of Peter Vanderwarker

Restoration of Lion and Unicorn Statues, Old State House

Address:

206 Washington Street

Owner:

City of Boston

Architect:

Commodore Builders
Skylight Studios

Project Team:

The Bostonian Society
John F. Shea Co.
Marr Crane Rigging
NER Construction Management Inc.
Old State House Museum
Preservation Technology Associates
Simpson, Gumpertz, & Heger
Storeygard Associates Architects

The Lion and Unicorn Statues adorn the east façade of the Old State House, which was built in 1713 as the seat of government for the Massachusetts Bay Colony before the American Revolution. Drawn from Great Britain’s royal coat of arms, the lion and unicorn graced the building from 1748 (and possibly earlier) as symbols of the government offices housed inside, and as a projection of royal authority. On July 18, 1776, after the Declaration of Independence was first read to the citizens of Boston, from the balcony of the Old State House, jubilant citizens pulled down the lion and unicorn, and burned them in a bonfire, along with other symbols of the British crown. Replicas made of copper have been in place since the building’s first restoration in 1882.

The restoration of the Lion and the Unicorn statues was guided by a prominent group of experts who have for many years collectively formed the Bostonian Society’s Old State House Preservation Team, working closely with the experienced general contractors, Commodore Builders. Although owned by the City of Boston, The Old Statehouse has as its caretaker the Bostonian Society. As Boston’s oldest public buildings and among the most important buildings of Colonial America its stewardship is an important challenge for which the Bostonian Society should be commended.

While more routine masonry and wood repairs were undertaken throughout the building, the work that attracted the most attention from the public and the press was the restoration of the statues. Subcontractors hoisted down the two statues from the upper parapets, created custom crates for them, and transported the “life-size’ animals to Skylight Studios, a sculpture restoration studio. Repairs were made to their copper and steel structures, and shiny new coats of palladium and gold leaf were applied to their surfaces. By a happy coincidence during the project, the Bostonian Society had been alerted to old evidence that a time capsule had been inside the lion when it was first created, and the discovery and opening of the capsule made international news. Before the statues were hoisted back up onto the Old State House in November 2014, a new capsule was put inside the lion containing a variety of materials proposed by the public. These magnificent statues once again adorn one of Boston’s most iconic buildings and remind us of our nation's earliest days of independence.

“The Lion and Unicorn today are essential icons of Boston and its Colonial History. They are symbolic of our collective origin story, and the public interest in their restoration is testimony to the public, national ownership felt of the Old Statehouse,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Yet it falls to the Bostonian Society to assure this symbol of our nation remains for centuries more. The never-ending care of the Old Statehouse deserves recognition with this particularly remarkable achievement of the restoration of the Lion and Unicorn.”

Henry Moss, winner of Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement

Photo courtesy of Richard Mendelkorn

Henry Moss
Principal
Bruner/Cott Architects and Planners

Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement

Henry Moss, an accomplished architect and preservationist, illustrates through his career and personal ethos the progression of historic preservation philosophy in America. After experiencing the demolition of entire city blocks under Urban Renewal in Wilmington, Delaware, Henry arrived at Harvard as an undergraduate and witnessed the massive demolition of Boston's Government Center. As a student, he absorbed the principles of Modern Architecture, believing that new buildings should symbolize progress. While in graduate school for architecture during the Vietnam War, Henry began to awaken to the politicized geography of cities, to appreciate the significance of existing neighborhoods, and to look at their buildings seriously.

The recipient of a travelling fellowship, Henry later moved his family to Amsterdam. There he observed low-rise, street car-based, mixed-use neighborhoods of conventional timber and brick construction that seemed to function beautifully. A research position at University College London studying how people actually use buildings led to 15 years of life and work in England. He taught there and combined a practice centered on social housing with historic preservation. In 1976, he was appointed Architect to the Fabric of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, a 1724 English Baroque church in London, and continued his work with other religious properties— an involvement that culminated years later in the Steeples Project, a system for bricks & mortar grants conceived and managed by Historic Boston Incorporated.

Henry has worked at the firm of Bruner/Cott & Associates in Cambridge, MA since 1986. He is best known for contributions to large-scale adaptive reuse projects such as MASS MoCA, the Watertown Arsenal, Channel Center in the South End, the Waltham Watch Factory, and a variety of university buildings in New England. During the past decade, his work has centered on the reawakening of large-scale, often underappreciated, mid-century modern buildings. The most visible local examples are Josep Lluis Sert's exposed concrete towers at Boston University and the Holyoke Center in Harvard Square.

For twenty-five years, Henry was a leader of the Boston Society of Architects Historic Resources Committee and was one of the founding members of DOCOMOMO/New England, a nonprofit dedicated to the modern movement. He is on the projects committee at Historic Boston Incorporated and the Properties Committee at Historic New England. Many point to Henry's steady, rational, and modest leadership as well as his kind mentorship as key foundational elements of Boston's thoughtful preservation mentality.

Through his diverse career and experience, Henry Moss has learned to appreciate architecture from both the recent and distant past and how their juxtaposition creates more fluid streetscapes. The evolution of Henry's career parallels historic preservation in general: from protecting primarily the nation's most iconic sites to preserving buildings and places from all eras that reflect the narrative of our diverse and powerful heritage. And, as an architect, always focusing on how people interact with these spaces.

The Boston Preservation Alliance is proud to award Henry Moss the 2015 Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Jonathan G. Davis

Photo courtesy of The Davis Companies

Jonathan G. Davis
Founder and Chief Executive Officer
The Davis Companies

President’s Award for Excellence

Jonathan Davis is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of The Davis Companies, one of the Northeast’s leading real estate investment, development and management firms. With nearly forty years of experience, Jon plays a central role in setting company strategy, identifying and evaluating new opportunities, capital-raising and management of the existing investment portfolios. Jon’s impressive career investing in the built environment reflects his dedication to the renewed vibrancy of Boston and the many other communities in which the company operates.

The substantial portfolio of The Davis Companies, including a broad diversity of building types, has always embraced historic buildings and their unique character. Period buildings often must be creatively adapted to respond to the modern demands of a thriving metropolis and find the balance that allows them to evolve, yet preserves their unique contributions to their city’s character; a task which is often challenging. Jon’s sensitive approach to preserving the character of existing architecture demonstrates his understanding of the contribution of historic buildings to the vibrancy of a cityscape and to the city’s future success. Illustrative of this principle, among the over 1.5 million square feet of historic renovation projects The Davis Companies has undertaken over the years, is an impressive Richardsonian building, the Exeter Street Theatre, which Jon creatively preserved by adaptively reconfiguring an unused and tired, multistory space into first-class office and retail space and reactivating the streetscape, thereby revitalizing this impressive landmark.

Jon also saved and renovated the badly deteriorated St. Cloud Hotel in the South End, designed in 1869 by Nathaniel Bradlee, into elegant residential units, working artists’ studios and neighborhood retail spaces that continue to serve this Landmark Neighborhood today. In fact, Jon’s first major development project, completed in his late 20’s, was the redevelopment of the Henderson Carriage Building in Porter Square Cambridge, into 100,000 square feet of office and retail space, and one of the company’s largest recent development projects, which is currently underway, is the redevelopment of the 460,000 square foot Union Trust Building in Downtown Pittsburgh, a rare and magnificent example of Flemish Gothic architecture commissioned in 1915 by Henry Clay Frick and designed by Frederick Osterling.

Not only is Jon passionate about his profession, he is also dedicated to making a meaningful difference in our city, serving in a leadership capacity in the philanthropic, civic and political life of Boston. He is involved with an impressive list of nonprofit organizations that make our city special, most especially having served as the immediate Past Chairman of The Board of the Boy’s and Girl’s Club of Boston, which serves 16,000 inner city kids in Boston and Chelsea and manages Camp Harbor View, which provides nearly 1,000 of Boston’s youth a summer camp experience on Long Island in Boston Harbor. Jon is also the Vice Chairman of The Board of his alma mater, Brandeis University, and was a long standing member of the Board of Combined Jewish Philanthropies.

The Boston Preservation Alliance is delighted to recognize Jonathan Davis of The Davis Companies with the 2015 President’s Award for Excellence.