Preservation Achievement Awards

Clapp Family Barn view project

Clapp Family Barn

Dorchester

Commonwealth Avenue Townhouse view project

Commonwealth Avenue Townhouse

Back Bay

First Parish Church view project

First Parish Church

Dorchester

Fort Hill Tower view project

Fort Hill Tower

Roxbury

Liberty Mutual Boston Headquaraters view project

Liberty Mutual Boston Headquaraters

Back Bay

LogMeIn Corporate Headquarters view project

LogMeIn Corporate Headquarters

South Boston Waterfront

Maverick Marketplace view project

Maverick Marketplace

East Boston

 

North Bennet Street School view project

North Bennet Street School

North End

Walgreens view project

Walgreens

Downtown Crossing

BackBayHouses.org view project

www.BackBayHouses.org

website

Howard Elkus view project

President's Award for Excellence
Howard F. Elkus FAIA, RIBA, LEED AP

David Manfredi view project

President's Award for Excellence
David P. Manfredi FAIA, LEED AP

Antonia Pollak view project

Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement
Antonia (Toni) Pollak

Clapp Family Barn, Dorchester

Photo courtesy of Dorchester Historical Society

Clapp Family Barn, Dorchester

Address:

195 Boston Street

Owner:

Dorchester Historical Society

Architect:

Structures North Consulting Engineers, Inc.

Project Team:

American Steeple and Tower Co., Inc.
Castlemaine Construction
Dan Luker Carpentry

Though it’s difficult to imagine now, Dorchester was once a rural farming community that supplied food to Boston residents, especially during the American Revolution. The Clapp family immigrated to Dorchester in 1630 and continuously maintained a home and farm at this location until 1953, when the property passed to the Dorchester Historical Society. The Clapp Family Barn, now engulfed in the dizziness of traffic, commerce, and a bustling neighborhood, sits quietly in the midst of the modern world as one of the last remaining barns in Boston. Built around 1845, this humble outbuilding supported the family's farming activities, especially the production of their famous Clapp Pears. The storage lofts, bays for wagons and sleds, and animal stalls serve as a serene setting for the rare surviving farming tools, original hardware and wide plank floors, advertising signage, and agricultural equipment–vestiges of a former way of life in Dorchester.

Over time the Clapp Family Barn weathered and deteriorated. The Dorchester Historical Society carefully stabilized the structure by repairing rotted sills and framing and reconstructing doors, windows, shingles, siding, and other elements. Still equipped with the family’s original farming tools, the barn now also serves as an educational space that tells the story of Dorchester’s bucolic early history.

“Barns and outbuildings, once common elements of the farm-dominated landscape in Dorchester and Roxbury, are now rare survivors in the city,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “The Clapp Family Barn, owned, restored, and operated by the Dorchester Historical Society, provides a snapshot of the past, both by its resilience to the development around it and the farming implements it has stored for so long. The Society utilized skilled craftsmen to make major structural repairs integral to this restoration, demonstrating that deteriorated framing and rotted sills can be successfully repaired with superb results.”

Commonwealth Avenue Townhouse, Back Bay

Photo courtesy of Eric Roth

Commonwealth Avenue Townhouse, Back Bay

Address:

Commonwealth Avenue

Owner:

Sea-Dar Construction

Architect:

Ann Beha Architects

Project Team:

AHA Consulting Engineers, Inc.
Aniceto, Inc.
Building Conservation Associates
DeAngelis Iron Work, Inc.
Dynamic Architectural
Howard/Stein-Hudson Associates, Inc.
John F. Shea Co., Inc.
Morgan Wheelock Inc.
Phoenix Bay Construction
Richmond So Engineers
R.P. Marzilli & Co.
Sea-Dar Construction
Simpson Gumpertz and Heger
Sladen Feinstein Lighting Design
SUN Engineering
Tischler und Sohn
Vivat Construction Sales, Inc.

Sometime before 1937, one of the iconic residences along Boston’s historic Commonwealth Avenue was demolished. For decades, this lot was nearly the only “missing tooth” along the beautiful, tree lined alée. In 2013, Ann Beha Architects and SeaDar Construction assumed the responsibility of creating a new residence on this historic street. With a goal of referencing and respecting the surrounding architecture without copying it, the project team successfully executed a modern townhouse that achieves architectural excellence while seamlessly blending into the streetscape.

Like its neighbors, the townhouse presents a four-story main façade with a stepped mansard roof and consistent cornice line. Though less common than brownstone or brick, the limestone of the façade is historically appropriate and used elsewhere in the neighborhood, most noticeably across the street at the historic Vendome. The composition of this new design was also derived from neighboring buildings and features a street level entrance, rusticated ground floor, and elongated windows with cast-iron balconies on the second floor "piano nobile." The size of the lot, 25% wider than most along this street, determined a flat façade rather than the more typical bay window. The façade's reserved, four bay rhythm defers to the prominent semi-circular conservatory of the Ames Mansion next door. The building's clean lines express its modern construction without detracting from the historic character of this unique setting.

“Designing infill buildings to replace those lost within historic districts is one of the most challenging issues in preservation,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “This project manages to fill the ‘missing tooth‘ by providing a design in character with this iconic Boston street but without mimicking its historic neighbors. It fits its context most beautifully. While not mistaken into believing the building is historic, the viewer may be taken aback by the fact that it is new construction, given its traditional styling and materials.”

First Parish Church, Dorchester

Photo courtesy of McGinley Kalsow & Associates, Inc.

First Parish Church, Dorchester

Address:

10 Parish Street

Owner:

First Parish Church in Dorchester

Architect:

McGinley Kalsow & Associates, Inc.

Project Team:

Alpha Weatherproofing
Building Legacy, LLC
DeAngelis Iron Works, Inc.
MacLeod Consulting, Inc.
Marr Crane and Rigging
Murphy Specialty, Inc.
North Bennet Street School Preservation Carpentry Program
Parish Restoration Committee
Soep Painting Corporation
W.W. Millworks

Dorchester’ first parish was founded in 1630, prior to the departure of the first immigrants from England who sailed in the ship 'Mary & John.' The meetinghouse, enlarged and rebuilt many times over the years, served the growing community as both church and town hall, and was moved in 1645 to the current location, known thereafter as "Meetinghouse Hill." The fifth building was destroyed by fire and reconstructed in 1897 as "an old colonial type of meeting house, thus keeping unbroken the train of ideas which came with the good ship 'Mary & John'," as described on its dedication day. This new building, designed by Cabot, Everett, and Mead, was a near-replica of the prior 1816 structure and is now one of only two historic wooden meetinghouses that survive in the city. The building retains much of the original materials, details, and fenestration patterns as well as the original organ. This parish was the first religious society in Boston and has been at the heart of the Dorchester community for nearly 400 years.

Realizing the importance of the building as an historic treasure and an active community space, the parish undertook extensive restoration. Two years ago the congregation, known as the First Parish Church of Dorchester, made the difficult decision to sell its collection of 17th- and 18th-century church silver to raise funds for the project. Guided by McGinley Kalsow architects and completed by Murphy Specialty, restoration and repair work was conducted on wooden clapboards, roofing and flashing, windows, sash, and decorative trim. With the assistance of preservation carpentry students from the North Bennet Street School and generous donations of time and equipment from the Boston Building Trades, the deteriorated steeple and lantern sections were reconstructed and once again top this historic structure, making it visible from points across the city.

“Deteriorating historic religious properties are one of the biggest challenges the Alliance faces,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Shrinking congregations, deferred maintenance, and rising costs is a terrible combination. The quality of restoration work at First Parish Church in Dorchester, a congregation founded in 1630, should serve as a model for these buildings. Utilizing skilled craftsmen, including students from the North Bennet Street School, First Parish has returned a literal landmark, seen from much of the southeastern side of the city, to its former glory.”

Fort Hill Tower, Roxbury

Photo courtesy of David Nagahiro

Fort Hill Tower, Roxbury

Address:

Highland Park

Owner:

City of Boston

Architect:

Building Conservation Associates, Inc.
Russo Barr Associates

Project Team:

Chapman Waterproofing
City of Boston Property and Construction Management Department
Robert Pacitti

The iconic Fort Hill Tower overlooks Roxbury from the top of historic Highland Park, the location of a strategic fort during the American Revolution. Originally designed in 1869 by Nathaniel Bradlee and called the Cochituate Standpipe, the Gothic Revival style tower stored water from Lake Cochituate in Natick for local residents. Soon obsolete as a water tower when Roxbury was annexed by Boston, the structure and grounds fell into disrepair. Between 1895 and 1916 the firm of Olmsted, Olmsted, and Eliot made improvements to the property, including the addition of an exterior viewing balcony and the reconstruction of the quadrangular shape of the original fort.

In 2013, an extensive restoration effort was undertaken by the City of Boston. Russo Barr Associates, architects, and Building Conservation Associates paid special attention to historically appropriate methods and materials. This included the removal of paint and the restoration of period-appropriate mineral coatings, replacement of window glazing, and repairs to the cast iron staircase, metal roof, and arched wood windows. With exceptional attention to detail, the project team not only restored a unique, irreplaceable historic structure but also preserved a place essential to the collective memory of a Boston neighborhood.

“Today, water towers are typically utilitarian structures with little adornment,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “In previous generations, however, communities took a higher level of pride in their infrastructure and believed these measures of societal success should be celebrated. The Alliance is thrilled that the City of Boston brought this piece of historic civic pride into the present by meticulously restoring the often overlooked Fort Hill Tower, an 1869 Gothic-Revival tower built to celebrate the Cochichuate Standpipe, then an integral part of Roxbury's water supply system. The restored tower brings a sense of pride and connectedness to our collective past in this neighborhood.”

Liberty Mutual Boston Headquarters, Back Bay

Photo courtesy of Robert Benson

Liberty Mutual Boston Headquarters, Back Bay

Address:

157 Berkeley Street

Owner:

Liberty Mutual Insurance, Co.

Architect:

CBT Architects

Project Team:

Bard Rao + Athanas Consulting Engineers
The Cavan Group
Cavanaugh Tocci Associates
Colburn & Guyette Consulting
Colliers International
Copley Wolff Design Group
Dyer Brown & Associates
Elkus Manfredi Architects
Entek Engineers
Epsilon Associates
Gordon Smith Corporation
The Green Engineer
Haley & Aldrich
Harry Feldman
Howard/Stein-Hudson Associates
Hughes Associates
Ingersoll Rand
Kalin Associates
Lerch Bates
McNamara/Salvia
Nitsch Engineering
RDK Engineers
RWDI
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Turner Construction Company
Walker Parking

The new Liberty Mutual building proves that not all of Boston's best buildings are old. With the winning design for this site, CBT Architects collaborated with the BRA, the Boston Landmarks Commission, the Massachusetts Historical Commission, and the Alliance to find solutions to the challenge of designing a new building on a prominent corner surrounded by three historic neighborhoods—the Back Bay, South End, and Bay Village.

This twenty-two story, 855,000 square foot structure successfully incorporates the needs of a modern office building—workspace, underground parking, and an employee cafeteria—as well as the design elements and public spaces that make it a welcome new addition to the neighborhood. The building's distinctive triangular massing and curved edges are a direct response to the diagonal street grid. The punched window façade is articulated in a distinctive tripartite massing with a significant base, middle, and top that relates to the surrounding buildings. The Indiana limestone facades exude quality and strength in an era dominated by man-made materials. The site design also includes a new public urban park with water wall, colorful plantings, window boxes and other streetscape improvements, and a transparent glass skywalk inspired by the bridge in the Public Garden. With its attention to detail and thoughtful design, Liberty Mutual's new building sets a high standard for sensitive, appropriate development in Boston's irreplaceable historic neighborhoods.

“Large office buildings adjacent to historic districts present their own, multifaceted sets of challenges: how to reference the historic, how to best achieve the direct adjacency of old and new, how to sympathetically utilize modern materials on massive façades,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Liberty Mutual has successfully blended contemporary with historic, and working with the Alliance, Boston Landmarks Commission, and the Massachusetts Historical Commission, provided several amenities to the neighborhood including a small, urban-oasis park. New construction clad in Indiana limestone meets the restored Salada Tea historic headquarters. A glass pedestrian bridge over Stuart Street references the bridge in the Public Garden and nearby the restored bronze Salada tea doors stand watch.”

LogMeIn Corporate Headquarters, South Boston Waterfront

Photo courtesy of Alison Frazee

LogMeIn Corporate Headquarters, South Boston Waterfront

Address:

320 Summer Street

Owner:

Lincoln Property Company

Architect:

The Architectural Team
Spagnolo Gisness & Associates, Inc.

Project Team:

ASB Real Estate
Commercial Construction Consulting, Inc.
CRJA - IBI Group
Haley & Aldrich
Howard/Stein-Hudson Associates, Inc.
McNamara/Salvia, Inc.
Suffolk Construction Company
Tremont Preservation Services LLC

The building at 320 Summer Street was originally constructed in 1904 as a warehouse for the Boston Wharf Company. Adapted for office space before being left empty, the warehouse was purchased by LogMeIn, a technology startup founded in Massachusetts that provides remote access to the internet. Working with Suffolk Construction, The Architectural Team, and Spagnolo Gisness & Associates, LogMeIn capitalized on the synchronicity between its innovative mission and the historic dry goods warehouse.

By locating in the up-and-coming Innovation District, LogMeIn has invested in a redeveloping neighborhood, bringing competitive jobs and youthful energy to a part of the city historically dominated by industrial pursuits. Skillfully rehabilitating one of the district's many brick warehouses, the company restored the handsome façade of 320 Summer Street and reinvented its interior as contemporary office space, retaining and exposing much of the original flooring, beams, brick, and stone. The open spaces promote communication and collaboration between employees in an environment that celebrates the integrity of this utilitarian structure. As a LEED Silver-certified project with an 84% recycle rate, the cohesive juxtaposition of traditional materials and modern technology is an outstanding prototype for future growth in the Innovation District.

“The successful blend of old and new is a concept the Alliance frequently promotes, and the decision by hi-tech LogMeIn to rehabilitate this former Boston Wharf Company warehouse as their corporate headquarters is a superb example of this meshing of past, present, and future,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Here the exterior of the building is superbly restored, while the massive, exposed, internal, wooden beams are set off with modern, hi-tech flair. LogMeIn is part of a wave of new, modern uses in the Landmark Fort Point District, and their project stood out for its quality, creativity, and execution as the best for 2014.”

Maverick Marketplace, East Boston

Photo courtesy of John and Melissa Tyler

Maverick Marketplace, East Boston

Address:

154 Maverick Street

Owner:

John and Melissa Tyler

Project Team:

Bill Bailey
Carlo Basile, State Representative, East Boston
Mr. and Mrs. Marc Beaupre
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Elson
Farah Engineering
Hector Granados
Harvey Industries
Janet Knott
Salvatore LaMattina, City of Boston Councilor, District 1
Adrian Madaro
Anthony Petruccelli, Senator, East Boston
Alisandra Petruccelli
Douglas Santos
Tonia Scalcione
Twin Metals
Versacom Security Systems

When the Great Depression ravaged family finances across the country the small community of East Boston was no exception. In 1936, the East Boston Welfare Building was established to help families get back on their feet and start over. After sitting empty and decaying for nearly 20 years, the Welfare Building is once again helping East Boston families thrive, thanks to the dedication and elbow grease of John and Melissa Tyler.

Maverick Marketplace, located at 154 Maverick Street in East Boston, now hosts retail shops and eateries, professional services, community spaces, and two residential units. With affordable rents and flexible spaces, the building serves as a small business incubator for local entrepreneurs. The owners of the building, John and Melissa Tyler, managed the rehabilitation of this special building themselves. After scraping, sanding, painting, buffing, and a large amount of cleaning, this community resource is now open and thriving, proving that even small-scale projects can have a big impact on Boston's neighborhoods.

“Historic preservation is both a community and an individual activity,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Neighborhoods benefit immensely and support restored and adaptively used historic buildings, but it takes the fortitude of a company leader, or in this case a few dedicated individuals. Maverick Marketplace is the personal mission of John and Melissa Tyler. They creatively returned an abandoned civic building back into an asset to the community. More personal sweat equity likely went into this project than any of our other winners. Boston would benefit from more individuals like the Tylers.”

North Bennet Street School, North End

Photo courtesy of North Bennet Street School

North Bennet Street School, North End

Address:

150 North Street

Owner:

North Bennet Street School

Architect:

Kennedy and Violich Architecture LTD

Project Team:

Associated Elevator Companies, Inc.
Bond Bros. Inc.
Buro Happold Consulting Engineers
Carlysle Engineering Inc.
Cavalieri Construction Co.
Central Ceilings, Inc.
Colliers International
Commonwealth Building Systems, LLC
CS Illumination
Delta Beckwith Elevator Co.
DJ Plumbing and Heating
Door Security Solutions of New England
E.M. Duggan, Inc.
Epsilon Associates
Front Line, Inc.
Gaston Electric
Island Internationa Industries
John M. Kennedy & Co.
Kamco Supply Corp of Boston
Malatos Iron Works
Nitsch Engineering Inc.
Quality Air Metals, Inc.
S&F Concrete Contractors Inc.
Sunrise Erectors, Inc.
Thomas G. Gallagher Inc.
Universal Window and Door, LLC
Valente Mechanical, Inc.
Wausau Tile, Inc.
Yankee Environmental Serv, LLC

Incorporated in 1885, the North Bennet Street School is the only educational institution in the United States to offer eight full-time programs in craftsmanship. In 2012 the School purchased two historic buildings, the former North End Police Station and the City of Boston Print Shop, to unite their three separate campuses into one cohesive space. Both structures are prominent Georgian-revival style brick buildings, typical of Boston municipal buildings in the 20th century. The School successfully rehabilitated and joined these buildings with a contemporary connector, revitalizing the schools traditional mission in the North End.

The naturally-lit, multi-level link is set back from the façade, subtly connecting the buildings without disrupting the streetscape, and creating an ideal location for a lobby, public event space, gift shop, and an elevator to enhance handicap accessibility and circulation. The interiors of both buildings were outfitted with a new HVAC system and enhanced ventilation. The School's carpentry and preservation students also gained practical experience in their crafts by creating custom cabinetry for the new facility. Now with room to grow, the North Bennet Street School continues to be a source of pride for the North End and all of Boston.

“The North Bennet Street School has been teaching young craftsmen traditional skills and trades for the contemporary world since 1885,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Such training, what I would consider among the most noble of work, now occurs in two newly-merged and repurposed former city-owned, historic buildings. The new North Bennet Street School stands as a superb example of creative thinking that saves historic fabric in an environmentally and socially rewarding success story. And, as a bonus, the work that now occurs here supports the historic resources and arts of our region.”

Walgreens, Downtown Crossing

Photo courtesy of Benjamin Johnson

Walgreens, Downtown Crossing

Address:

20 School Street

Owner:

Walgreens Co.

Architect:

HPA Design, Inc.

Project Team:

Advanced Door Technologies
American Contractors Corp.
Angelini Plastering, Inc.
Automation Solutions, Inc.
Boston Steel Fabricators
Carlysle Engineering Inc.
Columbus Door Company
East Coast Fireproofing Co., Inc.
Easton Concrete Cutting and Drilling
Garaventa USA, INC.
Haven Restoration, Inc.
JEC Service
John F. Shea Co., Inc.
K&G Entrances
Lynnwell Associates, Inc.
Merrimac Tile Company, Inc.
P.J. Dionne Co., Inc.
Select Demo Services, LLC
Sentry Painting, Inc.
Shawmut Design and Construction
Starlite Construction
Stuart Dean Co. Inc.
Sweeney Drywall Finishes Corp.
The Waterproofing Company, Inc.

In 1972, the architectural firm of Kallman, McKinnell, & Knowles (the same firm responsible for the design of Boston's City Hall) designed a sweeping concrete structure in the heart of Downtown Crossing, a modern addition to the historic Five Cents Savings Bank. Flanked by the historic Old South Meeting House and Old Corner Bookstore, this mid-century modern building stands in stark contrast to the historic red-brick buildings. With a full-height glass curtain wall set behind massive columns, the structure dominates the corner of School and Washington Streets, a textbook illustration of this sometimes underappreciated architectural style. Now historically significant in its own right, this building is a landmark example of the bold, avant-garde movement that defined an era in American urbanism.

In 2013, Walgreens became the newest tenant of this iconic building. Taking advantage of the opportunity to occupy a dramatic space in a prominent location, Walgreens chose to restore the original fabric of both the 1972 addition and the 1925 bank building and highlight the features of the modern, innovative design. The architects of HPA Design, working with Shawmut Design and Construction, guided the restoration of the stone surfaces, ornamental brasses, hanging light fixtures, decorative plasterwork, and marble tile floors of the interior. To reinforce the building's original identity as the Five Cents Savings Bank, they restored the front revolving doors and the bank vault that now exhibits artifacts and information about the history of the site. Far more than the average pharmacy or convenience store, the Walgreens on School Street is truly a vibrant asset to the neighborhood and a preservation success.

“When the former Boston Five Cents Savings Bank in downtown’s central shopping district became vacant there was much lament about the impact of the loss to the neighborhood and concern about the future of the building,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “With the arrival of Walgreens, their treatment of the building, and the activity of their store, those concerns are eliminated. Walgreens celebrates Kallman, McKinnell, & Knowles’ 1972 building in a manner that demonstrates that successful restoration and modification of mid-century buildings is an attainable goal we should seek in other areas of the city.”

Back Bay Houses website

www.BackBayHouses.org

Address:

www.backbayhouses.org

Owner:

Nancy and Thomas High

In an increasingly digital culture, preservationists and historians have been challenged to find ways to translate information about the historic built environment into the intangible world of the internet. Taking a lead in digitizing information for public access are Tom and Nancy High of Boston's Back Bay. Their project, www.backbayhouses.org, compiled and synchronized a vast amount of research about the history, buildings, architects, and residents of the Boston's historic Back Bay neighborhood.

The website includes separate pages (about 970 total) for each residential Back Bay building (including buildings that have been demolished and replaced) in the area bounded by Arlington Street and Massachusetts Avenue, Beacon and Newbury streets. The buildings are listed and hyperlinked by street names and address numbers and each page includes a current picture and a small map. Historic photographs are being added continuously. The site traces owners and residents of each building, plus its architect and/or builder when known. A separate list of architects is included with links to the houses they designed or remodeled. Projects such as this that bring educational resources to the fingertips of the "tech generation" instill confidence that future preservationists will continue to learn about and protect Boston's irreplaceable historic neighborhoods.

“The awarding of a web site steps outside the norm for the Alliance, but the project privately completed by Tom and Nancy High deserves special praise and recognition,” said Greg Galer, Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance. “Their tremendous research and presentation efforts to share their findings has created an incredible resource for a wide variety of people who are interested in, working with, or considering preservation projects in the Landmark Back Bay. Backbayhouses.org should be an inspiration for other neighborhoods of the city.”

Howard F. Elkus FAIA, RIBA, LEED AP, Founding Principal, Elkus Manfredi Architects

Photo courtesy of Elkus Manfredi

Howard F. Elkus faia, riba, leed ap
Founding Principal
Elkus Manfredi Architects

President's Award for Lifetime Achievement

Howard Elkus' design work is ubiquitous in Boston's architecture as we know it today, and he continues to contribute to the beautification of the city. The Principal designer of Copley Place and The Heritage on the Garden, Howard is responsible for the creation of places that are celebrated nationwide as the benchmarks of modern mixed-use development. Since designing the Headquarters of the American Institute of Architects in Washington, DC, and the avant-garde, sustainable GSIS Headquarters in Manila, and master planning Stanford University's Near West Campus while at The Architects Collaborative, Howard became the youngest fellow of the AIA. He subsequently co-founded Elkus Manfredi Architects in 1988, where his work has grown to include a prolific array of international design.

Currently, Howard is leading the design for some of the most exciting mixed-use urban developments across the country, as one of the principal architects for Hudson Yards in New York City, the country's largest mixed-use project to-date; the 18-million-square-foot Miami Worldcenter; an 8-million-square-foot development in Santa Clara, California, slated to become the new heart of Silicon Valley; and he is directing design for the new 52-story Copley Place Residential Tower and expansion to his original design for the 3.5-million-square-foot complex.

A dedicated and visionary architect, Howard's practice has for decades been based in Boston. He is privileged to continue to work in partnership with many of the city's game-changers to not only build anew, but to preserve and restore the cherished landmarks that underpin Boston's heritage. He is currently leading the restoration and repositioning of both Quincy Market and The Old North Church. Recently he led the master planning of the Christian Science Plaza expansion, renovation of its facilities, and the vision for Huntington Avenue.

A longtime partner of Boston's academic institutions, Howard continues a two-decade relationship with Emerson College, where his work has helped shape the College's new "Campus on the Common," including the careful restoration of the Cutler Majestic Theatre, and the restoration and revitalization of the Paramount Center into a vibrant new mixed-use academic and performance center, both winners of multiple preservation and design awards. He has also led the design for new state-of-the-art facilities for Emerson including the Tufte Center for Performance and Production and renovations to several of the College's historic properties in the Theater District. Working with Harvard, Bentley, and Boston Universities, among other institutions, Howard's devotion to design for education has guided the evolution of a full range of instructional and residential facilities.

Notable projects in Boston also include the InterContinental Hotel, the recently-completed Radian at 120 Kingston Street, renovation of the Charles/MGH Red Line station, design of the Silver Line's Courthouse station, and Charlestown's Flagship Wharf.

Through mixed-use developments and comprehensive master plans nationally and worldwide, Howard's visionary talent is recognized as a driving force in the evolution of the built environment. His completed award-winning work includes CityPlace in West Palm Beach, Florida, a paradigm of new urbanism; the Peninsula Hotel and retail block at 730 North Michigan Avenue in Chicago; Pacific Place in Seattle; the Shops at Columbus Center in New York City's famed Time Warner Center; and the new Las Vegas City Hall.

With major work reaching from the Back Bay to Abu Dhabi and Istanbul, Howard Elkus' work is noted for its elegant architectural solutions to complex design challenges, and for providing thoughtful and sensitive solutions that consider both the human experience and the site-specific needs of every project.

A veritable pioneer of placemaking, Howard Elkus was the recipient of the prestigious Skyline Award for Outstanding Achievement from the The Massachusetts Building Congress, which recognizes exemplary contributions to the built environment and the design, construction and development community. The award has been given just six times in the 90-year history of the MBC.

Howard received a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and a Master of Architecture with Distinction from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and is a frequent lecturer worldwide on topics of design, placemaking, and urban revitalization.

David P. Manfredi FAIA, LEED AP, Founding Principal, Elkus Manfredi Architects

Photo courtesy of Elkus Manfredi

David P. Manfredi faia, leed ap
Founding Principal
Elkus Manfredi Architects

President's Award for Lifetime Achievement

As a founding principal of Elkus Manfredi Architects, David Manfredi has been privileged to work with a variety of industry and academic leaders from across the country on all types of building and planning projects. He is nationally recognized for his master planning, urban design, and placemaking work. At the heart of David's planning work are mixed-use urban developments that create active pedestrian environments, reuse existing building infrastructure and integrate living, working and social activities.

Locally, David has led the design teams responsible for Liberty Wharf, Vertex at Fan Pier, Trilogy and 1330 Boylston Street in the Fenway, Avalon at Exeter in the Back Bay and the West End Residences. Restoring existing building infrastructure, David is responsible for the residences at One First Street in Cambridge, which reclaimed a series of manufacturing buildings for another generation of use and is currently replanning the Sears block in Fenway with new retail arcade and residences that will make it a social hub in the city.

Under David's guidance, Elkus Manfredi led the planning process and building design of The Grove in Los Angeles, a 600,000-square-foot premier shopping environment adjacent to the famed Farmer's Market and CBS Studios; The Americana at Brand, a 16-acre mixed-use project incorporating retail, restaurants, cinema, residences, public space, and parking in Glendale, California; South Campus Gateway at The Ohio State University – a five-building mixed-use urban environment that provides a common ground between the University and the surrounding neighborhood; University Square at the University of Pennsylvania – a smart block in West Philadelphia including hotel and retail; and Belmar, a mixed-use downtown incorporating retail, office, and residences in Lakewood, Colorado.

David has also led the design of The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts – two urban high-rise research buildings; headquarters for Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Cambridge; planning and entitlement for 1.8 million square feet of life science, residential and retail in Cambridge for Alexandria Real Estate; Pfizer Pharmaceuticals at 610 Main Street in Cambridge; and master planning for over three million square feet of development at the University of Southern California.

Throughout his career, David has worked with a diverse range of clients — visionaries and leaders in their field — including Harvard University, University of Southern California, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Johns Hopkins University, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Pfizer, Millennium Pharmaceuticals, The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Walt Disney Imagineering, Boston Properties, Caruso Affiliated, The Druker Company, Forest City Commercial Group, Samuels & Associates, and Vornado Realty Trust.

A graduate of the University of Chicago and the University of Notre Dame, David Manfredi has practiced architecture since 1979.

Antonia (Toni) Pollak, winner of Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement

Antonia (Toni) Pollak

Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement

The Alliance is proud to present the Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement to Antonia (Toni) Pollak. As Boston's longest serving Parks Commissioner (2002-2014), Ms. Pollak has been a champion and effective advocate for the city's open spaces and historic resources including the $92m restoration of Frederick Law Olmsted's Muddy River project and the opening of Spectacle Island, formerly a landfill and now a magnificent park in Boston Harbor. During her tenure as Parks Commissioner, she oversaw more than $125 million in capital investment in over 286 parks, playgrounds, athletic facilities, natural areas, and historic landscapes, including historic burying grounds. That's 2,600 acres of open space cared for, enhanced, and treasured under her, three times the size of Central Park. Prior to her service in the City's Parks Department, Ms. Pollak was the Director of the Environment Department where she managed the commissions overseeing historic preservation, archaeology, air pollution, conservation and environmental compliance in the city, including during the massive Big Dig.

Throughout her career, Ms. Pollak has managed the preservation or restoration of a variety of historic properties including the Brewer Fountain and the former Men's Comfort Station on Boston Common (now the Earl of Sandwich), both of which are past recipients of the Alliance's Preservation Achievement Award. As the Executive Director of the Boston Preservation Alliance from 1983 to 1995, Ms. Pollak shaped our organization during a critical period in Boston's development history, and provided the strength and direction needed to advance our mission. Personally and emotionally committed, she continues to be supportive of preservation efforts in Boston and across the Commonwealth. Ms. Pollak retired from City Hall in 2014 and now serves on the Boards of Directors of Preservation Massachusetts, the Mass. DCR Stewardship Council, the Boston Harbor Associates, Gardens for Charlestown and remains engaged in a variety of preservation and conservation efforts.