Preservation Achievement Awards

2012 Awards

Dudley B-2 Neighborhood Police Station view project

Dudley B-2 Neighborhood Police Station

Dudley Square

Eustis Street Fire House view project

Eustis Street Fire House

20 Eustis Street, Roxbury

Everett Square Theatre Sign view project

Everett Square Theatre Sign

1-11 Fairmount Avenue,
Hyde Park

Faneuil Hall Visitor Center view project

Faneuil Hall Visitor Center

Faneuil Hall

Granary Burying Ground view project

Granary Burying Ground

Park and Tremont Streets

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum view project

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

280 Palace Road

Liberty Wharf view project

Liberty Wharf

220-270 Northern Avenue

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation at Massachusetts General Hospital view project

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation at MGH

2 North Grove Street

1801 Paul Revere Bell at Old South Meeting House view project

1801 Paul Revere Bell at
Old South Meeting House

310 Washington Street

 

Peabody Square Reconstruction view project

Peabody Square Reconstruction

Peabody Square, Dorchester

 

Statler Park view project

Statler Park

243 Stuart Street

St. Cecilia's Parish view project

St. Cecilia’s Parish

18 Belvedere Street

Richard J. Bertman, FAIA, LEED AP view project

Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement:
Richard J. Bertman, FAIA, LEED AP

 

 

Photo courtesy of Anton Grassl/ESTO

Dudley B-2 Neighborhood
Police Station

New Construction in Harmony
with Boston’s Built Environment

Owner/Developer:

City of Boston Public Facilities Department

Project Team:

Leers Weinzapfel Associates/Architects
Brown Sardina
J&J Contractors
LAM Partners
LeMessurier Consultants
WSP Flack & Kurtz

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Dudley Square was considered to be the “other downtown.” However, in recent years the heart of Roxbury had fallen on some difficult times. The new Dudley Square Police Station is prominently located in the center of the neighborhood and will serve as an anchor for the area's current revitalization. The new mission of the Boston Police Department heavily influenced the design concept for the station; the public lobby and community room are located in a glass tower in an effort to make visitors feel welcome, and the sturdy limestone reflects the safety and durability of the police force.

The three-story masonry building reflects the other architecture in the neighborhood, but with a modern twist: it is the first LEED certified building to be built by the City of Boston. The sustainable building design will feature a green roof, storm water retention tanks, a high performance exterior envelope and glazing, and an underslab ventilation system. The project will implement highly recyclable, local materials and minimal construction waste.

Photo courtesy of Historic Boston, Incorporated

Eustis Street Fire House

Rehabilitation/Restoration Preserving
Boston’s Architectural or Cultural Heritage

Owner/Developer:

Historic Boston, Incorporated

Project Team:

Bergmeyer Associates
Boston Landmarks Commission
Boston Redevelopment Authority
City of Boston Department of
   Neighborhood Development
Edward Ingersoll Browne Fund
Fitzmeyer and Tocci Associates, Inc.
George B. Henderson Foundation
Goulston & Storrs
H.W. Moore
Lee Kennedy Company
Massachusetts Housing Investment Corporation
North Bennet Street School
Structures North Consulting Engineers
Tremont Preservation Services
UMASS Archaeological Services

Situated adjacent to the oldest cemetery in Roxbury, the Eustis Street Fire House is the oldest standing firehouse structure in Boston. Designed by prominent local architect John Roulestone Hall, the building featured ornate Italianate details such as round-arched openings, carved wooden brackets, and a rusticated granite entryway with a basket handle arch. Also notable were the stables, which signified the shift to horse-drawn fire-fighting equipment, an innovation at the time. Over the last century, the site fell into disrepair, resulting in extensive structural damage and the collapse of the historic stables.

The enormous rehabilitation effort transformed the neglected Fire House into a modern office complex, one of several large preservation developments revitalizing Dudley Square. In addition to reconstructing the structural and interior damage, developers have restored the intricate carpentry and recreated the old “Torrent Six” sign. There is a brick walkway featuring a timeline of the site's history dating back to 1630 and interpretive fencing designed by artist John Tagiuri that depicts firefighters dashing to a fire, pulling a Hunneman engine. The Eustis Street Fire House represents the burgeoning revitalization of Dudley Square and a promising future for the neighborhood.

Photo courtesy of Renée DeKona Photography

Everett Square Theatre Sign

Lighting Design in Harmony
With Boston’s Built Environment

Owner/Developer:

Pat Tierney, Tierney Realty Group

Project Team:

Historic Boston, Incorporated
Bergmeyer & Associates
Boston Sign Company
Edward Ingersoll Browne Fund
Hyde Park Main Street

The Everett Square Theatre in Hyde Park was designed by architect Harry M. Ramsay in 1914 as a venue for "stores, offices, and motion picture exhibition." Although the building changed hands several times, it served as a movie theater under various names until the mid-nineteen eighties. The theater is of special nostalgic significance to the Hyde Park community as many residents have fond memories of attending shows there. The Edward Ingersoll Browne Fund received more letters in support of a grant for the sign and lobby project than any other in the Browne Fund's history, demonstrating the importance of this project to the community.

As part of the Historic Neighborhood Centers program, facilitated by Historic Boston Inc. in an effort to bring the economic and rehabilitative qualities of historic preservation to Hyde Park, the Everett Street Theatre was given high priority. The hope was that the recreation of the theater's original sign and the rehabilitation of the front foyer would garner support for the more costly rehabilitation of the entire building. The original sign was of the typical “Broadway Style:” open letters displaying bare incandescent light bulbs. The original 1915 permit for the theater provided the exact dimensions for the sign, allowing for a meticulously crafted recreation that bears a striking resemblance to the original.

Photo courtesy of Christine Piontek

Faneuil Hall Visitor Center

Integration of Preservation
and New Construction

Owner:

City of Boston

Developer:

National Park Service

Project Team:

Einhorn Yaffee Prescott
Eastern General Contractors
Mystic Scenic Studios
Proun Design
Wondercabinet Interpretive Design

Faneuil Hall has been a central hub of Boston since 1742, which is why any construction or renovation must be done with utmost care. To create a National Park Service Transportation and Information Hub, the recent renovation included selective demolition throughout the basement and market level. The removal of exterior paving made way for new stairs and a ramp, while new construction and rehabilitation of the basement made way for new public education space, public toilets, National Park Service offices, and storage space. The construction of a new visitor contact station, public information displays, museum store, and interior stair in the market level also add to the visitor's overall experience at Faneuil Hall.

As a National Historic Landmark, all renovations must have minimal impact on the building's historic, character-defining features. This renovation project was a thoughtful process with the most significant alterations occurring in more modern sections of the iconic building. Developers preserved a viewing window onto the surface of the central foundation wall, the only standing trace of the original structure's north wall.

Photo courtesy of Kelly Thomas

Granary Burying Ground

Rehabilitation/Restoration
of an Iconic Boston Landmark

Owner/Developer:

City of Boston Parks and Recreation Department

Project Team:

Walker-Kluesing Design Group
The Freedom Trail Foundation
Sequoia Construction

Established in 1660 in the heart of downtown Boston, Granary Burying Ground is famous for its historic inhabitants, such as John Hancock, Paul Revere, and Samuel Adams. An estimated one million people, Bostonians and tourists alike, come annually to pay their respects at this significant site. After many years of pedestrian traffic, the Freedom Trail attraction began to suffer the pressure of an increasing number of visitors; too much foot traffic had killed grass, compacted the soil, and caused erosion in the cemetery.

In order to prevent further degradation of the historic site, the Boston Parks and Recreation Department initiated several measures that would restore and maintain the landscape. Trees were pruned to allow more light into the grounds, areas with poor grass-growth were reseeded, and an annual turf maintenance plan was put into effect. To prevent pedestrians from trampling the grass, several pathways were widened, post-and chain fencing was installed, and paved standing areas were introduced near popular gravesites. Due to the delicate nature of Granary Burying Ground, project members worked diligently to preserve the historic resource without disturbing the sanctity of the burial site.

Photo courtesy of Benjamin Johnson

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Integration of Preservation
and New Construction

Owner/Developer:

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Project Team:

Renzo Piano Building Workshop
Burt Hill
Shawmut Design and Construction
American Architectural Iron Co.
Arup
Betons Prefabriques du Lac, Inc.
Buro Happold Consulting Engineers
Canatal
The Cheviot Corporation
Clevenger-Frable-LaVallee
Commonwealth Building Systems
DeAngelis Iron Works
East Coast Fireproofing
Emanouil, Inc.
Epsilon Associates
Front, Inc.
Geophysical Applications
Goulston & Storrs
The Govmark Organization
Harrington Bomanite
Harry R. Feldman, Inc.
Industrial Acoustics
IROS Elevator Design Service
Mark Richey Woodworking and Design, Inc.
McPhail Associates
Meridian Associates
Nagata Associates
Nitsch Engineering
Pizzotti Brothers, Inc.
Robert F. Mahoney & Associates
S&F Concrete Contractors
Southeastern Metal Fabricators

Spartan Engineering
Sterling Surfaces
Steve Keller and Associates
Stuart-Lynn Company
Thompson Company, Inc.
Valley Crest Landscape Development
The Waterproofing Company
WSP Flack & Kurtz

Isabella Stewart Gardner was an American philanthropist and patron of the arts. In 1903, Mrs. Gardner established her eponymous museum with a very specific vision in mind: she wanted to give art in America a new context by opening up her palace and courtyard to visitors who could experience music, the gardens, and classic and contemporary art, all under one roof. Her vision also included restrictive provisions about modifications to the original building, a purpose-built structure designed to resemble a fifteenth-century Venetian palace.

The 71,000 square foot modern addition complements the Venetian palace design of the museum without resembling it. The new construction, which gracefully connects to the original structure by way of a glass corridor, includes four floating pavilions which house a visitor and orientation area, special exhibition gallery for light-sensitive objects, an acoustically isolated music hall with vertically oriented seating, as well as classrooms, a café, gift shop, office spaces, and conservation labs. An ancillary structure contains additional offices, a greenhouse, and apartments for artists-in-residence. In renovating the museum, developers were also able to repurpose historical doors and windows that had previously been hidden from the public.

Photo courtesy of Peter Vanderwarker

Liberty Wharf

New Construction in Harmony
with Boston's Built Environment

Owner/Developer:

Cresset Development, LLC

Land Owner:

Massachusetts Port Authority

Project Team:

Elkus Manfredi Architects
Cavanaugh Tocci Associates
Childs Engineering
Consentini Associates
Fort Point Associates
The Green Roundtable
H.W. Moore Associates
John Moriarty & Associates
Kaplan Gehring McCarroll Architectural Lighting
McNamara/Salvia
Reed Hilderbrand Associates

The historic Jimmy’s Harborside opened on Boston Harbor in 1924 as the Liberty Cafeteria. The famous restaurant was a Boston landmark, serving customers for nearly eighty-five years in the same location. Although iconic, the building blocked pedestrian access to the waterfront as well as the view over Boston Harbor. Liberty Wharf was designed to rectify that problem, with new buildings configured to frame scenic waterfront sights, and inviting pedestrian walkways that complete a missing segment of the Boston Harborwalk.

The new Liberty Wharf is a 79,290-square foot commercial development comprised of three new buildings. The project is home to several restaurants, office space, outdoor decking, and a public boardwalk. Developers considered the historic fabric of the working port when choosing materials for this project; buildings feature natural materials such as wood, raw copper and granite, and the architecturally distinct buildings feature large bay windows along the street that represent traditional New England design. Liberty Wharf was designed with the community in mind, opening up access to the Harbor without detracting from the neighborhood.

Photo courtesy of Anton Grassl/ESTO

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation at Massachusetts General Hospital

New Construction in Harmony
with Boston's Built Environment

Owner/Developer:

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation at Massachusetts General Hospital

Project Team:

Leers Weinzapfel Associates Architects
Brown Sardina
BVH Integrated Services
The Cheviot Corporation
LAM Partners
Lim Consultants
Museum Design Associates
Turner Construction Company

Since its construction in 1891, the Resident Physician's House on Cambridge Street has housed many prominent physicians at Massachusetts General Hospital. When considering the site for a new museum, the development team of the Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation chose to incorporate the small brick building rather than destroy it. The historic building now serves as an archive and administrative offices for the museum, which is a stand out on Cambridge Street, with its prominent copper wrapping and transparent glazed first floor.

The new construction, which marks the 200th anniversary of Massachusetts General Hospital, is distinct while still paying homage to its surroundings. The copper recalls the ornamental copper details of Beacon Hill, as well as the pre-patinated copper at Charles/MGH Station. The glazed oriel window on the second floor of the museum resembles the gold dome of the State House, which can be seen from the roof. The distinguished new entryway for the hospital serves as a portal for the public to learn about the history and evolution of medicine, as well as a resource for clinicians. The sustainable building features a rooftop garden, recycled copper, and high performance, eco-friendly insulation.

Photo courtesy of Julie Sterling Photography

1801 Paul Revere Bell
at Old South Meeting House

Rehabilitation/Restoration Preserving
Boston’s Architectural or Cultural Heritage

Owner/Developer:

Old South Meeting House

Project Team:

The Clock Shop
McGinley Kalsow & Associates
Northland Restoration Company

Old South Meeting House's historic clock had been silent since the building's previous bell was removed when the congregation sold the building in the 1870s. The clock, which was built in 1766 and restored in 2009, is the oldest American-made clock in the United States still in operation in its original location. The replacement bell is quite rare; forged in 1801 at Paul Revere & Sons Bell and Cannon Foundry in the North End, it is one of only forty-six surviving bells made during Paul Revere's life.

The Paul Revere bell has had several homes in Westborough, Massachusetts, since it was cast, most recently residing in a church that was dissolved and the building sold. Upon moving the bell to Old South Meeting House, the headstock and frame were preserved, and the clock strike mechanism restored. Other missing parts were thoughtfully recreated with the highest quality materials. The 876-pound bell was installed in October of 2011 and rang out in celebration to mark the anniversary of the Boston Tea Party. The bell can be heard ringing hourly from Old South Meeting House, just as it did in the colonial era.

Photo courtesy of Christopher Barnes Photography

Peabody Square Reconstruction

Neighborhood Restoration Effort

Owner/Developer:

City of Boston Public Works Department

Project Team:

Nitsch Engineering
Boston Fire Department
Boston Landmarks Commission
Boston Redevelopment Authority
Boston Transportation Department
Boston Water and Sewer Commission
Carol R. Johnson Associates
Charles River Watershed Association
City of Boston Environment Department
City of Boston Parks and Recreation Department
Lin Associates
Mayor's Commission for Persons with Disabilities
Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Services
McCourt Construction

Peabody Square is located adjacent to Ashmont Station in Dorchester. For many years, the multi-legged configuration of the square was hazardous for pedestrians and vehicles alike, causing a high rate of accidents, making it difficult to cross the street, and creating traffic. Peabody Square's historic trough and clock tower, designed in 1909 by William Downes Austin, made preservation a priority in reconfiguring the layout of the intersection.

The new, simplified arrangement of Peabody Square made the intersection safer, added bicycle lanes, and relieved traffic. It is also an example of innovative, sustainable design and a welcome addition to the neighborhood. As a Green Street Pilot Demonstration Project, the new design has the capacity to reduce storm water runoff volume and remove pollutants from the waterways, contributing to improving water quality of the Neponset River. There is also new green space – a park and plaza that can be used for community events and also provides a prominent home for the historic clock tower and trough.

Photo courtesy of City of Boston Parks and Recreation Department

Statler Park

Restoration of a Park, Landscape,
or Natural Area

Owner of Plaza:

City of Boston Parks and Recreation Department

Owner of Roads:

City of Boston Public Works Department

Project Team:

Halvorson Design Partnership
D’Allessandro Corporation
Daedalus, Inc.
APS–Architectural Paving and Stone, Inc.
Rika Smith McNally & Associates
Freeport Fountains
D.L. Saunders Companies & The Boston Park Plaza Hotel
Motor Mart Garage

In June of 2011, the twelve-year quest to renovate Statler Park came to an end and a precious urban space in downtown Boston was revitalized. The renovation of historic Statler Park was a wide-ranging project encompassing not only the main green of the park, but also the adjacent roadways, crosswalks, and traffic island. The park now has a reconfigured lawn area with new benches, plants, and irrigation, as well as a central brick paved plaza with new benches and circular irrigated planting beds. New streetlights, tree planters, and bicycle racks line the freshly paved concrete sidewalks.

Statler Park’s centerpiece, a bronze fountain sculpture created in 1930 by American artist Ulysses Ricci, also underwent a restoration which included new plumbing and lighting, a restored fountain base, and perimeter basin wall. The expansion of a traffic island at Arlington Street, Stuart Street and Columbus Avenue foster a safer pedestrian area, and the installation of free Wi-Fi and handicap accessible crosswalks make a welcoming environment for the public.

Photo courtesy of Bruce T. Martin

St. Cecilia’s Parish

Rehabilitation/Restoration
of a Religious Property

Owner/Developer:

Boston Roman Catholic Archdiocese

Project Team:

Donham & Sweeney Architects
Shawmut Design and Construction
Alpha Delta
AM Fogarty & Associates
Building Conservation Associates
The Cheviot Corporation
Design Fabricators
Foley Buhl Roberts & Associates
Galeno & Associates
Garcia Galuska DeSousa
Goody Clancy
Harry R. Feldman, Inc.
John Canning Studios
Lincoln Property Company
McPhail Associates
NER Construction
Polaris Consultants
RF Walsh Company
Rojas Group
Rubin and Rudman
Salem Glass Company
Schirmer Engineering Corporation
Serpentino Stained Glass
Southfield Organ Builders
Suffolk Construction
Sullivan & McLaughlin
Valley Crest Landscape Development

St. Cecilia’s Parish, dedicated in 1894, was built by and for the maids and coachmen who served the aristocracy of Back Bay at the end of the nineteenth century. The Romanesque XII Century Norman church was founded with a mission of inclusion that can still be seen today through its diverse community.

During the multi-phased rehabilitation of St. Cecilia's Parish, the existing Parish House was demolished, but the original foundation was preserved. The lower church saw interior gut renovations and the rectory and upper church underwent selective renovations. On the site of the former Parish House, a new, two-story glass and steel addition was constructed. Prior to this project, the Parish had not undergone any restoration work since 1954.

Richard Bertman

Richard J. Bertman, FAIA, LEED AP

Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement

Richard Bertman is a founding Principal of CBT Architects. His work graces the skyline and streetscapes of Boston with such landmarks as 111 Huntington Avenue, Atlantic Wharf, the Nike building, and Liberty Mutual’s new addition to its Headquarters.

For years, Richard has been the force behind prominent restorations and renovations of historic buildings throughout the Northeast, notably the Ames Webster House, the John Adams Courthouse, the MFA’s recent renovation and expansion, the Massachusetts State Senate Chambers study, and the Quincy, Everett, Harvard and Woburn public libraries.

Richard’s passion for historic buildings started when the firm was founded 45 years ago and the firm’s roots were established in renovation and adaptive reuse. This appreciation for and knowledge of how to work with existing buildings has evolved into a love of integrating new, modern design with historic buildings and within existing context.

Richard holds undergraduate degrees from Harvard University and MIT, and a Master of Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley. A Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, Richard was past President of the Boston Society of Architects which awarded him a lifetime achievement award, their highest individual honor. He is a former Board Member of SPNEA (now Historic New England), served for many years as the Chair of the Back Bay Architectural Commission, was a Board Member of the South End Landmarks Commission and chaired the Design Review Committee for the Boston Landmarks Commission. In 1996, for his service to the city, he was designated an Honorary Boston Landmark by the Boston Landmarks Commission. He was among the first architects inducted into the New England Design, Hall of Fame. Richard received the United Way’s 2009 Leventhal/Sidman Real Estate & Building Industry Leadership Award. Early on, he taught at the Rhode Island School of Design and at the Boston Architectural Center, where for many years he served on the Board of Directors. Richard continues to be active in public service as President of the Downtown North Association, a Board Member of the Massachusetts School Building Authority, and the Preservation Alliance.

CBT has been the recipient of over 200 design awards for its work, including the Urban Land Institute’s Global Award for Excellence for the Prudential Center Redevelopment, the City of Boston’s first annual Green Business Award, and a Special Firm Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Sculpture is Bertman’s secret life. Meshing gears, pulleys, switches and wheels with wire and fabric to forge funky, evocative, kinetic, moving creations, he instills in his art the unaffected, down-to-earth quality that reminds us of the complexity, frivolity, spontaneity and vitality in our daily lives.