Preservation Achievement Awards

Paramount Center view project

Paramount Center

545 Washington Street

Ames Building view project

Ames Building

One Court Street

Congress Street Bridge view project

Congress Street Bridge

 

Folio Boston view project

Folio Boston

80 Broad Street

McCormack Post Office view project

John W. McCormack Post Office and Courthouse

5 Post Office Square

New England Conservatory Campus view project

New England Conservatory Campus

290 Huntington Avenue

Old South Meeting House Tower Clock Restoration view project

Old South Meeting House Tower Clock Restoration

310 Washington Street

Park Street Church view project

Park Street Church

One Park Street

ZUMIX Engine 40 Firehouse view project

ZUMIX Engine 40 Firehouse

260 Sumner Street, East Boston

The Power Station view project

The Power Station

540 Harrison Avenue, South End

Lisa Greenfield view project

Lisa Greenfield

 

Dr. Judith Selwyn view project

Codman Award for
Lifetime Achievement:
Dr. Judith Selwyn

 

Photo courtesy of Peter Vanderwarker

Paramount Center

Significant Rehabilitation/Restoration

Owner/Developer:

Emerson College

Project Team:

Elkus Manfredi Architects
Haley & Aldrich
Vanderweil Engineers
Nitsch Engineering
Silverman Associates
BOND Brothers
EverGreene Painting Studios
Ammann & Whitney
Auerbach-Pollock-Friedlander

Built in 1932, the historic Paramount Theatre had fallen into a state of disrepair since closing its doors in 1976. Emerson College led an extensive renovation of the property, including an adjacent vacant lot, and the former cinema space of 1,700 seats has been adapted into a 590-seat live performance venue. Historic finishes were restored and many of the Art Deco architectural details and features from the original theater were repurposed and incorporated into the new complex.

The Paramount Center also houses a student residence hall, a 150-seat Black Box Theatre, 170-seat Bright Family Screen Room, nine rehearsal studios, six practice rooms for individuals and small groups, a sound stage for film production classes, a scene shop, several classrooms, a restaurant, and more than a dozen offices for faculty and staff. This mixed-used development along Boston’s Washington Street has added 180,000 square feet of new and renovated construction and is a key component of the nearly $500 million in renovations that Emerson College has invested in the revitalization of Boston's Midtown Theater District, which aims to enhance the larger Boston community.

Photo courtesy of Bruce Martin (www.brucetmartin.com)

Ames Building

Significant Rehabilitation/Restoration

Owner/Developer:

Normandy Real Estate Partners
Ames Hotel Partners LLC – Eamon O’Marah,
Rich Kilstock, Seth Greenberg

Project Team:

Cambridge Seven Associates
ADD, Inc.
Morgans Hotel Group
WSP Flack + Kurtz
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
The Walsh Company
MacRostie Historic Advisors
Rockwell Group
Building Conservation Associates
Sladen Feinstein Integrated Lighting

Built in 1890, the Ames Building was designed by Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge and stood as Boston’s tallest building at the time. Upon its completion, the building became a prominent office location in Boston's growing financial district and its height offered Bostonians a unique vantage point of the city, the roof being a popular tourist attraction. Creating a building style unique to its time, the structure blended Romanesque and Byzantine architectural styles and incorporated a masonry façade of blue slate and red sandstone details along with decorative carvings. In 1974 the Ames Building was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

After purchasing the building in 2007, Normandy Real Estate Partners and Ames Hotel Partners transformed the empty building into one of Boston's newest boutique hotels, currently operated by Morgans Hotel Group. Respecting the historic character of the building, the project included skillful restoration of the exterior masonry façade, window surrounds and moldings, and careful restoration of the lobby's vaulted mosaic-tiled ceiling.

Photo courtesy of Mark Flannery

Congress Street Bridge

Significant Rehabilitation by a Public Agency

Owner/Developer:

City of Boston

Project Team:

City of Boston Public Works Department
STV Incorporated
McGinley Kalsow & Associates
Boston Redevelopment Authority
Boston Landmarks Commission
Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Walsh Construction

Built in 1930 by the Strauss Bascule Bridge Company of Chicago, the Congress Street Bridge is one of the few surviving Strauss overhead counterweight bascule moveable bridges in the country and is the largest and most highly ornamented of the three Strauss overhead counterweight bascule bridges in the Massachusetts Highway Department Bridge inventory. It serves as a vital link between downtown Boston and the Fort Point Channel Historic District.

To preserve the unique ornamentation and design of the bridge, preservation efforts included replacement of weathered and weakened materials, new utilities, and replication of the original lanterns. Exposed granite was cleaned, repaired or rebuilt to expose the aesthetics of the old piers. Traffic lanes on the bridge were reconfigured to accommodate bicycle lanes and sidewalks were replaced and modified to provide ADA-compliant accessibility.

Photo courtesy of Anton Grassl/ESTO

Folio Boston

Notable New Construction in Harmony with Boston's Built Environment

Owner/Developer:

The Suffolk Company

Project Team:

CBT Architects
McNamara/Salvia, Inc.
SEi Companies
John Moriarty & Associates
Pressley Associates
Spaulding & Slye (now Jones Lang LaSalle)

As the first residential structure built in the Financial District in the past seventeen years, Folio Boston provides an opportunity to encourage 24-hour activity in an otherwise 9-to-5 district with a mixed-use approach. The 172,000 square foot building combines upscale retail, below grade parking, and luxury condominiums, while integrating itself architecturally into the surrounding downtown environment.

The Folio Boston project also preserved and integrated a historic 1807 building by Boston architect Charles Bulfinch. This three-story building became the corner building between two taller towers and served as the architectural inspiration for the design and materials used in the complex. Above the small Bulfinch building, the Folio towers utilized iron-spot brick of deep purple and complementary burnt ochre brick. Designed to engage daylight, jutting metal windowpanes and sills protrude to capture the sun, activating the façade and enlivening the surface of the structure and the surrounding neighborhood.

Photo courtesy of Carol M. Highsmith Photography, Inc.

John W. McCormack Post Office and Courthouse

Significant Rehabilitation by a Public Agency

Owner/Developer:

United States General Services Administration

Project Team:

Goody Clancy
Suffolk Construction
Tishman Construction

Designed by Cram and Ferguson and completed in 1933, the John W. McCormack Post Office and Courthouse is one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture in Boston. Located at Post Office Square, the building operates as a federal office building and courthouse, and was designated a Landmark by the Boston Landmarks Commission in 1988.

The rehabilitation project encompassed 607,000 square feet of floor space and preserved the defining Art Deco features of the building, including the decorative plaster ceiling, terrazzo floors with marble inlay, decorative bronze fretwork and grilles, and the exterior granite and limestone façade. Many green elements were also included in the project, such as a self-sustaining green roof covering 25% of the site footprint, daylight dimming systems and occupancy sensors, as well as new, Boston Landmarks Commission approved, energy efficient windows.

Photo courtesy of Christine Piontek

New England Conservatory Campus

Exceptional Maintenance of a Historic Property

Owner/Developer:

New England Conservatory

Project Team:

Wessling Architects
Leggat McCall Properties
Epsilon Associates
Tishman Construction
NER Construction Management Company
The Cheviot Corporation
DM Berg Consultants

The New England Conservatory Campus renovation project concentrated on the exterior renovation of four buildings: Jordan Hall, 295 Huntington Avenue, 241 St. Botolph Street, and 33 Gainsborough Street. With three of the four buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places, emphasis on historic preservation and sustainability was crucial. Throughout the project, planners worked closely with the Massachusetts Historical Commission in order to remain in compliance with Secretary of the Interior/National Park Service standards.

Focusing on authenticity and sustainability, exterior materials were matched as closely as possible for color, texture and appearance. New stucco, terracotta, and marble were installed and all façade masonry joints were either cut and repointed or given new sealants. Energy-efficient options included the installation of a white roofing system on Jordan Hall, as well as the replacement of failed windows with either new wood windows or insulated aluminum windows to match the historic nature of the buildings.

Photo courtesy of Kara Chisholm

Old South Meeting House
Tower Clock Restoration

Restoration of an Iconic Boston Landmark

Owner/Developer:

Old South Meeting House

Architect:

McGinley Kalsow & Associates
The Clock Shop
Architectural Preservation
Northland Restoration Company
Architectural Conservation Services
Building Conservation Associates

The restoration process for the Old South Meeting House Tower Clock ensured that the oldest working tower clock in New England will continue to tick for another few centuries. Created in 1766 and installed in 1770, the Tower Clock became a prominent icon of the Boston cityscape and is believed to be the oldest tower clock in New England still in operation in its original location.

The year-long restoration process started in 2009 and brought together many expert preservationists. The North clock face was carefully restored and the South clock face (too damaged to restore) was replicated in solid mahogany. With paint analysis, a more accurate understanding of the earlier clock appearance was gained. The faces of the clock now appear in their earliest known vibrant black color, made with a traditional smalting process. Along with the exterior, the clockworks were carefully disassembled, cleaned, and replaced when necessary. After the restoration process, the clock faces were reattached with a new, more secure, attachment system where the clocks will remain for generations to come.

Photo courtesy of Anton Grassl/ESTO

Park Street Church

Successful Adaptation to Accommodate Accessibility

Owner/Developer:

Park Street Church

Project Team:

Mills Whitaker Architects
Marc Truant & Associates
Structures North Consulting Engineers
Forte Engineering
Johnson Engineering & Design
Preservation Technology Associates
Acentech Incorporated
Haley & Aldrich

Designed by architect Peter Banner and built in 1809, Park Street Church has served the community of Boston for over two hundred years. This brick and wood structure has played host to many socially significant events, including the first public speech by abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison and the first singing of the patriotic hymn, "America." As a prominent Boston landmark, the recent renovations strove to make the church more accessible to parishioners and visitors, as well as improve deteriorated exterior conditions. An open space Welcome Center was created to connect the historic Tremont Street and contemporary Park Street entrances.

Other accessibility-related improvements included the rebuilding of a central elevator and an upgrade of the public entrance on Park Street. Exterior work consisted of masonry repairs to brick and brownstone facades, replacement of deteriorated roofing and gutters, and the removal of abandoned fire escapes.

Photo courtesy of ZUMIX, Inc.

ZUMIX Engine 40 Firehouse

Significant Neighborhood Rehabilitation

Owner/Developer:

ZUMIX, Inc.

Project Team:

Utile, Inc.
Aberjona Engineering
Crossfield Engineering
New Ecology, Inc.
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Schirmer Engineering Corporation
Acentech
Landmark Structures Corporation

Built in 1923, the Engine 40 Firehouse originally serviced the Jeffries Point neighborhood of East Boston and eventually housed the Boston Fire Boat. Long vacant, and severely dilapidated, the building was purchased in 2005 by ZUMIX, Inc., a non-profit cultural organization dedicated to building community through the arts. Extensive renovations re-established the building as a prominent fixture in the neighborhood and created a 9,000 square foot facility to increase programming space for ZUMIX students.

The interior was masterfully adapted to house a state of the art performance center, sound studios, practice rooms, classroom space, a recording studio and administrative space, with a few reminders of the firehouse, including the pipe banisters in the stairwells and the original fire pole. The exterior boasts custom made, red firehouse doors, Tudor styling, and the station badge in cast stone on the front of the building. The project is also pursuing a LEED Silver Certification.

Photo courtesy of Christine Piontek

The Power Station

Creative Preservation of a Historic Structure

Owner/Developer:

GTI Properties/540 Harrison Avenue Realty Trust

Project Team:

Grassi Design Group
MGM Contracting
O'Connor Masonry
JA Masonry
Souza and True Partners

Designed by William G. Preston and built from 1889 to 1892, the West End Street Railway Central Power Station was, at the time, the largest privately-owned electric generation plant in the world and served to power the company's electric trolley cars which ran all over the city of Boston. After 1899 the station supplied power to the Boston Elevated Railway and its final incarnation was as a maintenance facility.

After being abandoned for many years and falling into disrepair, The Power Station building was purchased by 540 Harrison Avenue Realty Trust in 1998 and the structure underwent a thorough restoration. Brick facades were repointed and cleaned, new windows were installed to match the original glazing, and the building’s six roofs were restored using the original slates. The massive front arches, multiple peaked roofs, handsome buttressing and Longmeadow brownstone accents enhance the striking beauty of this remarkable building situated in the SoWa Arts District.

Photo of "Coil/Recoil" courtesy of Daniel van Ackere

Lisa Greenfield

Significant Public Art Contributing to Boston's Urban Fabric

Collaborators:

Jennifer Moses
Daniel van Ackere

An artist and urban planner, Lisa Greenfield had her first major public art installation in Boston in 2001. This collaboration with Jennifer Moses, entitled "Redefining Open Space," installed 5,000 square feet of sod on the sidewalk of the Summer Street Bridge creating a carpet of grass and drawing attention to two definitions of open space: the city's sidewalk and the neighborhood's park.

Over the past decade, Greenfield has collaborated on the following installations: Seven Wonders/Boston (2003-2004); Fort Point 25 Year Timeline (2004); Park/Park (2005); Starry Night (2009-2010) and her solo work includes: Walking on Water (2007); House of Cards (2008); Coil/Recoil (2009). Each work captures the imagination of the public and brings attention to issues facing Boston neighborhoods and specifically uses the medium of public art to call attention to Fort Point Channel as a thriving artist community.

Dr. Judith Selwyn

Dr. Judith Selwyn

Codman Award for Lifetime Achievement

After graduating from what was then the largest public high school in New York, Judy Rosenkranz went on to study chemistry at Brooklyn College. National Science Foundation Undergraduate research fellowships provided her with opportunities for summer research at Brooklyn College and then at MIT where she enrolled as a graduate student in physical chemistry and subsequently received her PhD.

After enrolling in the newly started preservation program at Boston University, Dr. Selwyn was hired out of the classroom by the instructors and she joined the consulting staff at the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, giving her the opportunity to work with some of the true pioneers in the field of architectural conservation.

In 1978, she formed Preservation Technology Associates, Inc. to provide architectural conservation services to architects, government agencies, non-profits and others responsible for historic properties.

Specializing in masonry conservation and historic roof restoration, "Dr. Judy " has participated in more than 1,000 projects over her distinguished career. Her projects include the Boston Athenaeum, the Old State House, the Massachusetts State House, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Harvard's Memorial Hall, Touro Synagogue and the Carnegie Museum, as well as numerous churches, public and academic buildings. Dr. Selwyn serves on MIT's Corporation Committee for the Chemistry Department and she has been a long-time member of the Brookline Preservation Commission. Earlier this year, Dr. Selwyn was honored by Preservation Massachusetts with a Paul E. Tsongas Profiles in Preservation Award.

Dr. Selwyn and her husband Lee live in a 100-year-old house in Brookline and their family includes three grown children and two grandsons.